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The Oscar Quest: Facts, Trivia and other Miscellanea

This is just a random collection of facts and such that I’ve acquired over all my years of paying attention to the Academy Awards.

If you know me — you know that if there’s one thing I’m full of (that’s not puns) — it’s facts and trivia. I am insanely good at knowing when films came out, and random facts about them. Throw me a random Oscar category (from the Quest). I’ll tell you what was nominated. Give me the character name of someone nominated for Best Actor or Best Actress since 1970. I’ll get it right 98% of the time. For some reason, I’m like a savant for this stuff.

Plus, people like trivia. They like reading all those little bits and pieces of facts. It’s great when you know something that you know other people don’t know and you can just whip it out — “You know that film that won only got nominated because the other one got disqualified, right?” You feel good, and you sound smart. Plus we all like to tell what we know to other people.

So here are a bunch of facts and shit (* official title) about the Oscars. I’m sure more will be added whenever I get them/are told them/give a shit. You know how it works. Also, these are in absolutely no order. I just wrote down what I remembered, found stuff, looked stuff up and threw it in a Word document, and am now simply copying, pasting and dressing it up a bit. I’m not classy. There’s a reason this isn’t the A-Movie Blog.

  • First Oscar-winners in color:

Best Picture: 1939, Gone With the Wind (1929, The Broadway Melody had some sequences in two-strip Technicolor)

Best Actor: 1951, Humphrey Bogart, The African Queen

Best Actress: 1939, Vivien Leigh, Gone With the Wind

Best Supporting Actor: 1938, Walter Brennan, Kentucky

Best Supporting Actress: 1939, Hattie McDaniel, Gone With the Wind

Best Director: 1939, Victor Fleming, Gone With the Wind


Films that won the most Oscars:

  • The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, 2003, 11 Oscars (out of 11 nominations)
  • Ben-Hur, 1959, 11 Oscars (out of 12 nominations)
  • Titanic, 1997, 11 Oscars (out of 14 nominations)
  • West Side Story, 1961, 10 Oscars (out of 11 nominations)
  • Gigi, 1958, 9 Oscars (out of 9 nominations)
  • The Last Emperor, 1987, 9 Oscars (out of 9 nominations)
  • The English Patient, 1996, 9 Oscars (out of 12 nominations)
  • Slumdog Millionaire, 2008, 8 Oscars (out of 10 nominations)
  • Cabaret, 1972, 8 Oscars (out of 10 nominations) *
  • Amadeus, 1984, 8 Oscars (out of 11 nominations)
  • Gandhi, 1982, 8 Oscars (out of 11 nominations)
  • My Fair Lady, 1964, 8 Oscars (out of 12 nominations)
  • On the Waterfront, 1954, 8 Oscars (out of 12 nominations)
  • Gone With the Wind, 1939, 8 Oscars (out of 13 nominations)
  • From Here to Eternity, 1953, 8 Oscars (out of 13 nominations)
  • The Best Years of Our Lives, 1946, 7 Oscars (out of 8 nominations)
  • The Bridge on the River Kwai, 1957, 7 Oscars (out of 8 nominations)
  • Going My Way, 1944, 7 Oscars (out of 10 nominations)
  • Lawrence of Arabia, 1962, 7 Oscars (out of 10 nominations)
  • Patton, 1970, 7 Oscars (out of 10 nominations)
  • The Sting, 1973, 7 Oscars (out of 10 nominations)
  • Out of Africa, 1985, 7 Oscars (out of 11 nominations)
  • Dances with Wolves, 1990, 7 Oscars (out of 12 nominations)
  • Schindler’s List, 1993, 7 Oscars (out of 12 nominations)
  • Shakespeare in Love, 1998, 7 Oscars (out of 13 nominations)
  • Gravity, 2013, 7 Oscars (out of 10 nominations) *

* DID NOT win Best Picture


Most Oscar nominations (film):

  1. All About Eve, 1950, 14 nominations (6 wins, Best Picture)
  2. Titanic, 1997, 14 nominations (11 wins, Best Picture)
  3. Gone With the Wind, 1939, 13 nominations (8 wins, Best Picture)
  4. From Here to Eternity, 1953, 13 nominations (8 wins, Best Picture)
  5. Shakespeare in Love, 1998, 13 nominations (7 wins, Best Picture)
  6. Forrest Gump, 1994, 13 nominations (6 wins, Best Picture)
  7. Chicago, 2002, 13 nominations (6 wins, Best Picture)
  8. Mary Poppins, 1964, 13 nominations (5 wins)
  9. Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, 1966, 13 nominations (5 wins)
  10. The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, 2003, 13 nominations (4 wins)
  11. The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, 2008, 13 nominations (3 wins)
  12. Ben-Hur, 1959, 12 nominations (11 wins, Best Picture)
  13. The English Patient, 1996, 12 nominations (9 wins, Best Picture)
  14. On the Waterfront, 1954, 12 nominations (8 wins, Best Picture)
  15. My Fair Lady, 1964, 12 nominations (8 wins, Best Picture)
  16. Dances with Wolves, 1990, 12 nominations (7 wins, Best Picture)
  17. Schindler’s List, 1993, 12 nominations (7 wins, Best Picture)
  18. Mrs. Miniver, 1942, 12 nominations (6 wins, Best Picture)
  19. Gladiator, 2000, 12 nominations (5 wins, Best Picture)
  20. The Song of Bernadette, 1943, 12 nominations (4 wins)
  21. A Streetcar Named Desire, 1951, 12 nominations (4 wins, Best Picture)
  22. The King’s Speech, 2010, 12 nominations (4 wins, Best Picture)
  23. Reds, 1981, 12 nominations (3 wins)
  24. Lincoln, 2012, 12 nominations (2 wins)
  25. Johnny Belinda, 1948, 12 nominations (1 win)
  26. Becket, 1964, 12 nominations (1 win)
  27. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, 2003, 11 nominations (11 wins, Best Picture)
  28. West Side Story, 1961, 11 nominations (10 wins, Best Picture)
  29. Gandhi, 1982, 11 nominations (8 wins, Best Picture)
  30. Amadeus, 1984, 11 nominations (8 wins, Best Picture)
  31. Out of Africa, 1985, 11 nominations (7 wins, Best Picture)
  32. The Godfather Part II, 1974, 11 nominations (6 wins, Best Picture)
  33. Oliver!, 1968, 11 nominations (5 wins, Best Picture)
  34. Terms of Endearment, 1983, 11 nominations (5 wins, Best Picture)
  35. Saving Private Ryan, 1998, 11 nominations (5 wins)
  36. The Aviator, 2004, 11 nominations (5 wins)
  37. Hugo, 2011, 11 nominations (5 wins)
  38. Life of Pi, 2012, 11 nominations (4 wins)
  39. Sunset Boulevard, 1950, 11 nominations (3 wins)
  40. The Godfather, 1972, 11 nominations (3 wins, Best Picture)
  41. Julia, 1977, 11 nominations (2 wins)
  42. Rebecca, 1940, 11 nominations (2 wins)
  43. Sergeant York, 1941, 11 nominations (2 wins)
  44. Judgment at Nuremberg, 1961, 11 nominations (2 wins)
  45. A Passage to India, 1984, 11 nominations (2 wins)
  46. Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, 1939, 11 nominations (1 win)
  47. The Pride of the Yankees, 1942, 11 nominations (1 win)
  48. Chinatown, 1974, 11 nominations (1 win)
  49. The Turning Point, 1977, 11 nominations (0 wins)
  50. The Color Purple, 1985, 11 nominations (0 wins)


Most Oscar Nominations (acting):

  • Meryl Streep, 18 nominations (3 wins, Best Supporting Actress 1979, Best Actress 1982, Best Actress 2011)
  • Katharine Hepburn, 12 nominations (4 wins, Best Actress 1932-1933, Best Actress 1967, Best Actress 1968, Best Actress 1981)
  • Jack Nicholson, 12 nominations (3 wins, Best Actor 1975, Best Supporting Actor 1983, Best Actor 1997)
  • Bette Davis, 10 nominations (2 wins, Best Actress 1935, Best Actress 1938)
  • Laurence Olivier, 10 nominations (1 win, Best Actor 1948)
  • Spencer Tracy, 9 nominations (2 wins, Best Actor 1937, Best Actor 1938)
  • Paul Newman, 9 nominations (1 win, Best Actor 1986)
  • Marlon Brando, 8 nominations (2 wins, Best Actor 1954, Best Actor 1972)
  • Jack Lemmon, 8 nominations (2 wins, Best Supporting Actor 1955, Best Actor 1973)
  • Al Pacino, 8 nominations (1 win, Best Actor 1992)
  • Geraldine Page, 8 nominations (1 win, Best Actress 1985)
  • Peter O’Toole, 8 nominations (0 wins)


Best Picture Winners with the Least Oscar Wins:

  • The Broadway Melody, 1928-1929, 1 win
  • Grand Hotel, 1931-1932, 1 win
  • Mutiny on the Bounty, 1935, 1 win
  • Wings, 1927-1928, 2 wins
  • All Quiet on the Western Front, 1929-1930, 2 wins
  • You Can’t Take It With You, 1938, 2 wins
  • Rebecca, 1940, 2 wins
  • The Greatest Show on Earth, 1952, 2 wins
  • Cimarron, 1930-1931, 3 wins
  • Cavalcade, 1932-1933, 3 wins
  • The Great Ziegfeld, 1936, 3 wins
  • The Life of Emile Zola, 1937, 3 wins
  • Casablanca, 1943, 3 wins
  • Gentleman’s Agreement, 1947, 3 wins
  • All the King’s Men, 1949, 3 wins
  • Midnight Cowboy, 1969, 3 wins
  • The Godfather, 1972, 3 wins
  • Rocky, 1976, 3 wins
  • Crash, 2005, 3 wins
  • Argo, 2012, 3 wins
  • 12 Years a Slave, 2013, 3 wins

(Also of note: All three films to win the “Big Five” — Best Picture, Best Actor, Best Actress, Best Director and Best Screenplay — It Happened One Night, One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest, The Silence of the Lambs (see how I worked that one in? Worked in the one fact about the Oscars that everyone knows that you have to mention anyway, but you don’t want to say, just because it’s hokey — it’s like exposition), they only won those five awards. Nothing else. That’s fascinating.)


Clean Sweeps (Best Pictures that won every award they were nominated for):

  • Grant Hotel, 1932, 1 for 1
  • It Happened One Night, 1934, 5 for 5
  • Gigi, 1958, 9 for 9
  • The Last Emperor, 1987, 9 for 9
  • The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, 2003, 11 for 11


Shut Outs (Films with the most nominations that won nothing)

  • The Turning Point, 1977, 0 for 11
  • The Color Purple, 1985, 0 for 11
  • American Hustle, 2013, 0 for 10
  • True Grit, 2010, 0 for 10
  • Gangs of New York, 2002, 0 for 10
  • The Little Foxes, 1941, 0 for 10
  • Peyton Place, 1957, 0 for 9
  • Quo Vadis, 1951, 0 for 8
  • The Nun’s Story, 1959, 0 for 8
  • The Sand Pebbles, 1966, 0 for 8
  • The Elephant Man, 1980, 0 for 8
  • Ragtime, 1981, 0 for 8
  • The Remains of the Day, 0 for 8


Films That Won Best Picture Without Winning Any Acting Awards:

  • Wings, 1927-1928
  • The Broadway Melody, 1928-1929 (nominated for Actress)
  • All Quiet on the Western Front, 1929-1930
  • Cimarron, 1931 (nominated for Actor and Actress)
  • Grand Hotel, 1931-1932
  • Cavalcade, 1932-1933 (nominated for Actress)
  • Mutiny on the Bounty, 1935 (nominated for Actor (x3))
  • You Can’t Take It With You, 1938 (nominated for Supporting Actress)
  • Rebecca, 1940 (nominated for Actor, Actress and Supporting Actress)
  • Casablanca, 1943 (nominated for Actor and Supporting Actor)
  • An American in Paris, 1951
  • The Greatest Show on Earth, 1952
  • Around the World in 80 Days, 1956
  • Gigi, 1958
  • The Apartment, 1960 (nominated for Actor, Actress and Supporting Actor)
  • Lawrence of Arabia, 1962 (nominated for Actor and Supporting Actor)
  • Tom Jones, 1963 (nominated for Actor and Supporting Actress (x3))
  • The Sound of Music, 1965 (nominated for Actress and Supporting Actress)
  • Oliver!, 1968 (nominated for Actor and Supporting Actor)
  • Midnight Cowboy, 1969 (nominated for Actor (x2) and Supporting Actress)
  • The Sting, 1973 (nominated for Actor)
  • Rocky, 1976 (nominated for Actor, Actress, and Supporting Actor (x2))
  • Chariots of Fire, 1981 (nominated for Supporting Actor)
  • Out of Africa, 1985 (nominated for Actress and Supporting Actor)
  • Platoon, 1986 (nominated for Supporting Actor)
  • The Last Emperor, 1987
  • Schindler’s List, 1993 (nominated for Actor and Supporting Actor)
  • Braveheart, 1995
  • Titanic, 1997 (nominated for Actress and Supporting Actress)
  • The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, 2003
  • Crash (nominated for Supporting Actor)
  • The Departed, 2006 (nominated for Supporting Actor)
  • Slumdog Millionaire, 2008
  • The Hurt Locker, 2009 (nominated for Actor)
  • Argo, 2012 (nominated for Supporting Actor)

– – – – – – – –

Films That Won Best Picture Without Being Nominated for Any Acting Awards:

  • Wings, 1927-1928
  • All Quiet on the Western Front, 1929-1930
  • Grand Hotel, 1931-1932
  • An American in Paris, 1951
  • The Greatest Show on Earth, 1952
  • Around the World in 80 Days, 1956
  • Gigi, 1958
  • The Last Emperor, 1987
  • Braveheart, 1995
  • The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, 2003
  • Slumdog Millionaire, 2008


Films That Won the Most Oscars Without Winning Best Picture:

  • Cabaret, 1972, 8 Oscars (Winner: The Godfather)
  • A Place in the Sun, 1951, 6 Oscars (Winner: An American in Paris)
  • Star Wars, 1977, 6 Oscars (Winner: Annie Hall)
  • Wilson, 1944, 5 Oscars (Winner: Going My Way)
  • The Bad and the Beautiful, 1952, 5 Oscars (Most wins of any film without a Best Picture nomination; Winner: The Greatest Show on Earth)
  • The King and I, 1956, 5 Oscars (Winner: Around the World in 80 Days)
  • Mary Poppins, 1964, 5 Oscars (Winner: My Fair Lady)
  • Doctor Zhivago, 1965, 5 Oscars (Winner: The Sound of Music)
  • Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, 1966 5 Oscars (Winner: A Man for All Seasons)
  • Saving Private Ryan, 1998, 5 Oscars (Winner: Shakespeare in Love)
  • The Aviator, 2004, 5 Oscars (Winner: Million Dollar Baby)
  • Hugo, 2011, 5 Oscars (Winner: The Artist)
  • Gravity, 2013, 7 Oscars (Winner: 12 Years a Slave)


Films With the Most Oscar Nominations Without a Best Picture Nomination:

  • They Shoot Horses, Don’t They?, 1969, 9 nominations
  • The Poseidon Adventure, 1972, 8 nominations
  • Close Encounters of the Third Kind, 1977, 8 nominations
  • Ragtime, 1981, 8 nominations
  • Dreamgirls, 2006, 8 nominations (only time film with the most nominations for the year wasn’t nominated for Best Picture)
  • The Dark Knight, 2008, 8 nominations
  • Joan of Arc, 1948, 7 nominations
  • Come to the Stable, 1949, 7 nominations
  • Hud, 1963, 7 nominations
  • Pepe, 1960, 7 nominations
  • Hush… Hush, Sweet Charlotte, 1964, 7 nomonations
  • Hawaii, 1966, 7 nominations
  • Thoroughly Modern Millie, 1967, 7 nominations
  • Star!, 1968, 7 nominations
  • Victor/Victoria, 1982, 7 nominations
  • Aliens, 1986, 7 nominations
  • Dick Tracy, 1990, 7 nominations
  • Bullets over Broadway, 1994, 7 nominations
  • Cold Mountain, 2003, 7 nominations

 

The Correlation Between Most Nominations and Best Picture and Best Director*:

(* = Anything in PURPLE won without having the most nominations that year.)

Year

Film(s) with Most Nominations (# of nominations)

Best Picture Winner

Best Director Winner

1927-1928

Seventh Heaven & Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans (4)

Outstanding Production: Wings

Unique or Artistic Production: Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans

Dramatic: Frank Borzage, Seventh Heaven

Comedy: Lewis Milestone, Two Arabian Knights

1928-1929

In Old Arizona (5)

The Broadway Melody

Frank Lloyd, The Divine Lady

1929-1930

The Love Parade (6)

All Quiet on the Western Front

Lewis Milestone, All Quiet on the Western Front

1930-1931

Cimarron (7)

Cimarron

Norman Taurog, Skippy

1931-1932

Arrowsmith & The Champ (4)

Grand Hotel

Frank Borzage, Bad Girl

1932-1933

Cavalcade & A Farewell to Arms & Lady for a Day (4)

Cavalcade

Frank Lloyd, Cavalcade

1934

One Night of Love (6)

It Happened One Night

Frank Capra, It Happened One Night

1935

Mutiny on the Bounty (8)

Mutiny on the Bounty

John Ford, The Informer

1936

Anthony Adverse & Dodsworth & The Great Ziegfeld (7)

The Great Ziegfeld

Frank Capra, Mr. Deeds Goes to Town

1937

The Life of Emile Zola (10)

The Life of Emile Zola

Leo McCarey, The Awful Truth

1938

You Can’t Take It With You (7)

You Can’t Take It With You

Frank Capra, You Can’t Take It With You

1939

Gone With the Wind (13)

Gone With the Wind

Victor Fleming, Gone With the Wind

1940

Rebecca (11)

Rebecca

John Ford, The Grapes of Wrath

1941

Sergeant York (11)

How Green Was My Valley

John Ford, How Green Was My Valley

1942

Mrs. Miniver (12)

Mrs. Miniver

William Wyler, Mrs. Miniver

1943

The Song of Bernadette (12)

Casablanca

Michael Curtiz, Casablanca

1944

Going My Way & Wilson (10)

Going My Way

Leo McCarey, Going My Way

1945

The Bells of St. Mary’s (8)

The Lost Weekend

Billy Wilder, The Lost Weekend

1946

The Best Years of Our Lives (8)

The Best Years of Our Lives

William Wyler, The Best Years of Our Lives

1947

Gentleman’s Agreement (8)

Gentleman’s Agreement

Elia Kazan, Gentleman’s Agreement

1948

Johnny Belinda (12)

Hamlet

John Huston, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre

1949

The Heiress (8)

All the King’s Men

Joseph L. Mankiewicz, A Letter to Three Wives

1950

All About Eve (14)

All About Eve

Joseph L. Mankiewicz, All About Eve

1951

A Streetcar Named Desire (12)

An American in Paris

George Stevens, A Place in the Sun

1952

Moulin Rouge The Quiet Man (7)

The Greatest Show on Earth

John Ford, The Quiet Man

1953

From Here to Eternity (13)

From Here to Eternity

Fred Zinnemann, From Here to Eternity

1954

On the Waterfront (12)

On the Waterfront

Elia Kazan, On the Waterfront

1955

Love Is a Many-Splendored  & Marty & The Rose Tattoo (8)

Marty

Delbert Mann, Marty

1956

Giant (10)

Around the World in 80 Days

George Stevens, Giant

1957

Sayonara (10)

The Bridge on the River Kwai

David Lean, The Bridge on the River Kwai

1958

The Defiant Ones & Gigi (9)

Gigi

Vincente Minnelli, Gigi

1959

Ben-Hur (12)

Ben-Hur

William Wyler, Ben-Hur

1960

The Apartment (10)

The Apartment

Billy Wilder, The Apartment

1961

West Side Story (11)

West Side Story

Robert Wise & Jerome Robbins, West Side Story

1962

Lawrence of Arabia (10)

Lawrence of Arabia

David Lean, Lawrence of Arabia

1963

Tom Jones (10)

Tom Jones

Tony Richardson, Tom Jones

1964

Mary Poppins (13)

My Fair Lady

George Cukor, My Fair Lady

1965

Doctor Zhivago The Sound of Music (10)

The Sound of Music

Robert Wise, The Sound of Music

1966

Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (13)

A Man for All Seasons

Fred Zinneman, A Man for All Seasons

1967

Bonnie and Clyde & Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (10)

In the Heat of the Night

Mike Nichols, The Graduate

1968

Olvier! (11)

Oliver!

Carol Reed, Oliver!

1969

Anne of the Thousand Days (10)

Midnight Cowboy

John Schlesinger, Midnight Cowboy

1970

Airport & Patton (10)

Patton

Franklin J. Schaffner, Patton

1971

Fiddler on the Roof & The French Connection & The Last Picture Show (8)

The French Connection

William Friedkin, The French Connection

1972

Cabaret & The Godfather (10)

(Though if you include the withdrawn nomination, The Godfather had 11.)

The Godfather

Bob Fosse, Cabaret

1973

The Exorcist & The Sting (10)

The Sting

George Roy Hill, The Sting

1974

Chinatown & The Godfather Part II (11)

The Godfather Part II

Francis Ford Coppola, The Godfather Part II

1975

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest (9)

One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest

Milos Forman, One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest

1976

Network & Rocky (10)

Rocky

John G. Avildsen, Rocky

1977

Julia & The Turning Point (11)

Annie Hall

Woody Allen, Annie Hall

1978

The Deer Hunter & Heaven Can Wait (9)

The Deer Hunter

Michael Cimino, The Deer Hunter

1979

All That Jazz & Kramer vs. Kramer (9)

Kramer vs. Kramer

Robert Benton, Kramer vs. Kramer

1980

The Elephant Man & Raging Bull (8)

Ordinary People

Robert Redford, Ordinary People

1981

Reds (12)

Chariots of Fire

Warren Beatty, Reds

1982

Gandhi (11)

Gandhi

Richard Attenborough, Gandhi

1983

Terms of Endearment (11)

Terms of Endearment

James L. Brooks, Terms of Endearment

1984

Amadeus & A Passage to India (11)

Amadeus

Milos Forman, Amadeus

1985

The Color Purple & Out of Africa (11)

Out of Africa

Sydney Pollack, Out of Africa

1986

Platoon & A Room with a View (8)

Platoon

Oliver Stone, Platoon

1987

The Last Emperor (9)

The Last Emperor

Bernardo Bertolucci, The Last Emperor

1988

Rain Man (8)

Rain Man

Barry Levinson, Rain Man

1989

Driving Miss Daisy (9)

Driving Miss Daisy

Oliver Stoner, Born on the Fourth of July

1990

Dances with Wolves (12)

Dances with Wolves

Kevin Costner, Dances with Wolves

1991

Bugsy (10)

The Silence of the Lambs

Jonathan Demme, The Silence of the Lambs

1992

Howards End & Unforgiven (9)

Unforgiven

Clint Eastwood, Unforgiven

1993

Schindler’s List (12)

Schindler’s List

Steven Spielberg, Schindler’s List

1994

Forrest Gump (13)

Forrest Gump

Robert Zemeckis, Forrest Gump

1995

Braveheart (10)

Braveheart

Mel Gibson, Braveheart

1996

The English Patient (12)

The English Patient

Anthony Minghella, The English Patient

1997

Titanic (14)

Titanic

James Cameron, Titanic

1998

Shakespeare in Love (13)

Shakespeare in Love

Steven Spielberg, Saving Private Ryan

1999

American Beauty (8)

American Beauty

Sam Mendes, American Beauty

2000

Gladiator (12)

Gladiator

Steven Soderbergh, Traffic

2001

The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (13)

A Beautiful Mind

Ron Howard, A Beautiful Mind

2002

Chicago (13)

Chicago

Roman Polanski, The Pianist

2003

The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (11)

The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King

Peter Jackson, The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King

2004

The Aviator (11)

Million Dollar Baby

Clint Eastwood, Million Dollar Baby

2005

Brokeback Mountain (8)

Crash

Ang Lee, Brokeback Mountain

2006

Dreamgirls (8)

The Departed

Martin Scorsese, The Departed

2007

No Country for Old Men & There Will Be Blood (8)

No Country for Old Men

Joel & Ethan Coen, No Country for Old Men

2008

The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (13)

Slumdog Millionaire

Danny Boyle, Slumdog Millionaire

2009

Avatar The Hurt Locker (9)

The Hurt Locker

Kathryn Bigelow, The Hurt Locker

2010

The King’s Speech (12)

The King’s Speech

Tom Hooper, The King’s Speech

2011

Hugo(11)

The Artist

Michel Hazanavicius, The Artist

2012

Lincoln (12)

Argo

Ang Lee, Life of Pi

2013

Gravity & American Hustle (10)

12 Years a Slave

Alfonso Cuaron, Gravity

 

Animated Films Nominated for Best Picture:

  • Beauty and the Beast, 1991
  • Up, 2009
  • Toy Story 3, 2010


Best Picture Winners Adapted from a Pulitzer Prize-Winning Novel:

  • Gone With the Wind, 1939
  • All the King’s Men, 1949


Best Picture Nominees Adapted from a Pulitzer Prize-Winning Novel:

  • Arrowsmith, 1931-1932
  • Alice Adams, 1935
  • The Good Earth, 1937
  • The Grapes of Wrath, 1940
  • The Magnificent Ambersons, 1942
  • The Yearling, 1946
  • The Caine Mutiny, 1954
  • To Kill a Mockingbird, 1962
  • The Color Purple, 1985
  • The Hours, 2002


Best Picture Winners & Nominees Adapted from a Pulitzer Prize-Winning Play:

  • You Can’t Take It With You (Winner, 1938)
  • Our Town (Nominee, 1940)
  • A Streetcar Named Desire (Nominee, 1951)
  • Picnic (Nominee, 1955)
  • Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (Nominee, 1958)
  • The Diary of Anne Frank (Nominee, 1959)
  • Driving Miss Daisy (Winner, 1989)


Actors in 3 Best Picture Nominees in a Year:

  • Claudette Colbert, 1934 (It Happened One Night *, Cleopatra, Imitation of Life)
  • Charles Laughton, 1935 (Mutiny on the Bounty *, Les Misérables, Ruggles of Red Gap)
  • Thomas Mitchell, 1939 (Gone With the Wind, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Stagecoach *)
  • John C. Reilly, 2002 (Chicago *, Gangs of New York, The Hours)

* All were nominated for an acting Oscar that year (for the starred film). 2 won (Colbert — Best Actress, Mitchell — Best Supporting Actor).

(This list is probably missing someone. Some minor actor who was in a bunch of stuff. I’m really just looking for major people.)


Actors in Consecutive Best Picture Winners:

  • Clark Gable, 1934 (It Happened One Night) and 1935 (Mutiny on the Bounty)
  • Walter Pidgeon, 1941 (How Green Was My Valley) and 1942 (Mrs. Miniver)
  • Christopher Walken, 1977 (Annie Hall) and 1978 (The Deer Hunter)
  • Meryl Streep, 1978 (The Deer Hunter) and 1979 (Kramer vs. Kramer)
  • John Gielgud, 1981 (Chariots of Fire) and 1982 (Gandhi)
  • Ian Charleson, 1981 (Chariots of Fire) and 1982 (Gandhi)
  • Russell Crowe, 2000 (Gladiator) and 2001 (A Beautiful Mind)
  • Guy Pearce, 2009 (The Hurt Locker) and 2010 (The King’s Speech)
  • John Goodman, 2011 (The Artist) and 2012 (Argo)
  • Scoot McNairy, 2012 (Argo) and 2013 (12 Years a Slave)


Directors with Two Best Picture Nominees in One Year (* = winner)

  • 1931-1932, Ernst Lubitsch — One Hour With YouThe Smiling Lieutenant
  • 1936, Jack Conway — Libeled LadyA Tale of Two Cities
  • 1938, Michael Curtiz — The Adventures of Robin HoodFour Daughters
  • 1939, Victor Fleming — Gone With the Wind* The Wizard of Oz (unofficially, several more people had two this year)
  • 1940, Alfred Hitchcock — Rebecca*Foreign Correspondent
  • 1940, John Ford — The Grapes of WrathThe Long Voyage Home
  • 1940, Sam Wood — Kitty FoyleOur Town
  • 1942, Sam Wood — Kings Row The Pride of the Yankees
  • 1974, Francis Ford Coppola — The Conversation & The Godfather Part II*
  • 1977, Herbert Ross — The Goodbye Girl & The Turning Point
  • 2000, Steven Soderbergh — Erin Brockovich & Traffic


Foreign Language Films Nominated for Best Picture

  • Grand Illusion, 1938
  • Z, 1969
  • The Emigrants, 1972
  • Cries and Whispers, 1973
  • Il Postino, 1995
  • Life is Beautiful, 1998
  • Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon, 2000
  • Letters from Iwo Jima, 2006
  • Amour, 2012


Foreign Language Films with the Most Oscar Nominations:

  • Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000), 10 nominations (4 wins)
  • Life is Beautiful (1997, nominated in 1998), 7 nominations (3 wins)
  • Das Boot (1981, nominated in 1982), 6 nominations (0 wins)
  • Fanny and Alexander (1982, nominated in 1983), 6 nominations (4 wins)
  • Pan’s Labyrinth (2006), 6 nominations (3 wins)
  • Amour (2012), 5 nominations (1 win)


Best Picture Wins By Studio

(I’m going by the studio we know to have produced and/or distributed the films. Nowadays they award to the producers of the film. I just want to get an idea of which studio put out which nominees.)

  • Columbia — 12 wins (It Happened One Night, You Can’t Take It With You, All the King’s Men, From Here to Eternity, On the Waterfront, The Bridge on the River Kwai, Lawrence of Arabia, A Man for All Seasons, Oliver!, Kramer vs. Kramer, Gandhi, The Last Emperor)
  • Paramount — 11 wins (Wings, Going My Way, The Lost Weekend, The Greatest Show on Earth,  The Godfather, The Godfather Part II, Ordinary People, Terms of Endearment, Forrest Gump, Braveheart, Titanic)
  • United Artists — 11 wins (Marty, Around the World in 80 Days, The Apartment, West Side Story, Tom Jones, In the Heat of the Night, Midnight Cowboy, One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Rocky, Annie Hall, Rain Man)
  • Warner Bros — 10 wins (The Life of Emile Zola, Casablanca, My Fair Lady, Chariots of Fire, Driving Miss Daisy, Unforgiven, Million Dollar Baby, The Departed, Slumdog Millionaire, Argo)
  • 20th Century Fox — 9 wins (Cavalcade, How Green Was My Valley, Gentleman’s Agreement, All About Eve, The Sound of Music, Patton, The French Connection, Braveheart, Titanic)
  • MGM — 8 wins (The Broadway Melody, Grand Hotel, Mutiny on the Bounty, The Great Ziegfeld, Mrs. Miniver, An American in Paris, Gigi, Ben-Hur)
  • Universal — 8 wins (All Quiet on the Western Front, The Sting, The Deer Hunter, Out of Africa, Schindler’s List, Shakespeare in Love, Gladiator, A Beautiful Mind)
  • Miramax/The Weinstein Co. — 6 wins (The English Patient, Shakespeare in Love, Chicago, No Country for Old Men, The King’s Speech, The Artist)
  • Orion — 4 wins (Amadeus, Platoon, Dances with Wolves, The Silence of the Lambs)
  • DreamWorks — 3 wins (American Beauty, Gladiator, A Beautiful Mind)
  • RKO Radio — 2 wins (Cimarron, The Best Years of Our Lives)
  • Selznick International Pictures — 2 wins (Gone With the Wind, Rebecca)
  • Fox Searchlight — 2 wins (Slumdog Millionaire, 12 Years a Slave)
  • J. Arthur Rank-Two Cities Films — 1 win (Hamlet)
  • Lions Gate Entertainment — 1 win (Crash)
  • New Line Cinema — 1 win (The Lord of the Rings: Return of the King)
  • Paramount Vantage — 1 win (No Country for Old Men)
  • Summit Entertainment — 1 win (The Hurt Locker)

Notes (only if you want clarification/unnecessary confusion):

  1. Selznick International, in its two wins, only produced the films, and MGM (Gone With the Wind) and United Artists (Rebecca) distributed them. I only credited Selznick with the wins, since we can all agree he was the driving force behind them.
  2. Gladiator and A Beautiful Mind were both DreamWorks and Universal. Technically, both won, so I credited both. (Usually I checked distribution, but it seems, on one DreamWorks did domestic and Universal did international, and on the other, it was reversed. So I’m guessing it was pretty even. I just gave it to both.)
  3. Braveheart and Titanic were both Paramount and 20th Century Fox. Both got tallies.
  4. Shakespeare in Love was a joint Miramax/Universal win.
  5. One of the Miramax wins is credited to The Weinstein Co. (The King’s Speech). Since the Weinsteins are the creative force of both entities, I just left it as one name. (They sold Miramax to Disney and started another company. Same people, different name.)
  6. The Paramount Vantage win (No Country for Old Men) was split with Miramax. Both got tallies.
  7. The first Fox Searchlight win (Slumdog Millionaire) was split with Warner Bros. Both got tallies.


Best Picture Nominations By Studio

(There have been exactly 512 Best Picture nominees, including 2013. Some studios were nominated for the same film. The numbers don’t add up. But trust me, they’re all here.)

  • Warner Bros. — 77 nominations
    • Disraeli, 42nd Street, I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang, Here Comes the Navy, Captain Blood, A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Anthony Adverse, The Story of Louis Pasteur, The Life of Emile Zola, The Adventures of Robin Hood, Four Daughters, Jezebel, Dark Victory, All This and Heaven Too, The Letter, The Maltese Falcon, One Foot in Heaven, Sergeant York, Kings Row, Yankee Doodle Dandy, Casablanca, Watch on the Rhine, Mildred Pierce, Johnny Belinda, The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, A Streetcar Named Desire, Mister Roberts, Giant, Sayonara, Auntie Mame, The Nun’s Story, The Sundowners, Fanny, The Music Man, America America, My Fair Lady, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, Bonnie and Clyde, Rachel Rachel, A Clockwork Orange, Deliverance, The Emigrants, The Exorcist, The Towering Inferno, Barry Lyndon, Dog Day Afternoon, The Goodbye Girl, Chariots of Fire, The Right Stuff, The Killing Fields, The Color Purple, The Mission, The Accidental Tourist, Dangerous Liaisons, Driving Miss Daisy, Goodfellas, JFK, Unforgiven, The Fugitive, L.A. Confidential, The Green Mile, Mystic River, Million Dollar Baby, The Aviator, Good Night and Good Luck, The Departed, Letters from Iwo Jima, Michael Clayton, Slumdog Millionaire, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, The Blind Side, Inception, Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close, Argo, Gravity, Her
  • 20th Century Fox — 66 nominations (includes 2 20th Century Films and 7 Fox Films, before they merged — they’re the first nine films. The last two are the 20th Century films)
    • Seventh Heaven, In Old Arizona, East Lynne, Bad Girl, Cavalcade, State Fair, The White Parade, The House of Rothschild, Les Misérables, In Old Chicago, Alexander’s Ragtime Band, The Grapes of Wrath, How Green Was My Valley, The Pied Piper, Heaven Can Wait, The Ox-Bow Incident, The Song of Bernadette, Wilson, The Razor’s Edge, Gentleman’s Agreement, Miracle on 34th Street, The Snake Pit, A Letter to Three Wives, Twelve O’Clock High, All About Eve, Decision Before Dawn, The Robe, Three Coins in the Fountain, Love is a Many-Splenored Thing, The King and I, Peyton Place, The Diary of Anne Frank, Sons and Lovers, The Hustler, The Longest Day, Cleopatra, Zorba the Greek, The Sand Pebbles, Doctor Dolittle, Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid, Hello Dolly!, Patton, MASH, The French Connection, Sounder, The Towering Inferno, Julia, Star Wars, The Turning Point, An Unmarried Woman, Breaking Away, Norma, The Verdict, Prizzi’s Honor, Broadcast News, Working Girl, Braveheart, Titanic, The Thin Red Line, Moulin Rouge!, Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World, Avatar, Life of Pi, Lincoln
  • Paramount — 60 nominations
    • Wings, The Patriot, The Love Parade, Skippy, One Hour with You, Shanghai Express, The Smiling Lieutenant, A Farewell to Arms, She Done Him Wrong, Cleopatra, The Lives of a Bengal Lancer, Ruggles of Red Gap, Hold Back the Dawn, Wake Island, For Whom the Bell Tolls, Going My Way, Double Indemnity, The Lost Weekend, The Heiress, Sunset Boulevard, A Place in the Sun, The Greatest Show on Earth, Roman Holiday, Shane, The Country Girl, The Rose Tattoo, The Ten Commandments, Becket, Alfie, Romeo and Juliet, Love Story, The Godfather, The Godfather Part II, Chinatown, The Conversation, Nashville, Heaven Can Wait, Ordinary People, The Elephant Man, Atlantic City, Raiders of the Lost Ark, Reds, Terms of Endearment, Witness, Children of a Lesser God, Fatal Attraction, Ghost, The Godfather Part III, Forrest Gump, Braveheart, Titanic, Saving Private Ryan, The Hours, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button, Up in the Air, The Fighter, True Grit, Hugo, The Wolf of Wall Street
  • MGM — 57 nominations
    • The Broadway Melody, The Hollywood Revue of 1929, The Big House, The Divorcee, Trader Horn, Grand Hotel, The Champ, Smilin’ Through, The Barretts of Wimpole Street, The Thin Man, Viva Villa!, Mutiny on the Bounty, Broadway Melody of 1936, David Copperfield, Naughty Marietta, The Great Ziegfeld, Libeled Lady, Romeo and Juliet, San Francisco, A Tale of Two Cities, Captains Courageous, The Good Earth, Boys Town, The Citadel, Pygmalion, Test Pilot, Gone With the Wind, Goodbye Mr. Chips, Ninotchka, The Wizard of Oz, The Philadelphia Story, Blossoms in the Dust, Mrs. Miniver, Random Harvest, The Human Comedy, Madame Curie, Gaslight, Anchors Aweigh, The Yearling, Battleground, Father of the Bride, King Solomon’s Mines, An American in Paris, Quo Vadis, Julius Caesar, Seven Brides for Seven Brothers, Gigi, Ben-Hur, Mutiny on the Bounty, How the West Was Won, Doctor Zhivago, Network, The Goodbye Girl, Moonstruck
  • Columbia — 56 nominations
    • Lady for a Day, It Happened One Night, One Night of Love, Mr. Deeds Goes to Town, The Awful Truth, Lost Horizon, You Can’t Take It With You, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, Here Comes Mr. Jordan, 49th Parallel, The Talk of the Town, The More the Merrier, All the King’s Men, Born Yesterday, From Here to Eternity, On the Waterfront, The Caine Mutiny, Picnic, The Bridge on the River Kwai, Anatomy of a Murder, The Guns of Navarone, Lawrence of Arabia, Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, Ship of Fools, A Man for All Seasons, Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner, Oliver!, Funny Girl, Five Easy Pieces, The Last Picture Show, Nicholas and Alexandra, Taxi Driver, Midnight Express, Kramer vs. Kramer, Tess, Gandhi, Tootsie, The Big Chill, The Dresser, A Passage to India, A Soldier’s Story, The Last Emperor, Hope and Glory, Awakenings, The Prince of Tides, A Few Good Men, The Remains of the Day, The Shawshank Redemption, Sense and Sensibility, Erin Brockovich, The Social Network, Moneyball, Django Unchained, Zero Dark Thirty, American Hustle, Captain Phillips
  • United Artists — 52 nominations
    • Alibi, The Front Page, Arrowsmith, The Private Life of Henry VIII, The House of Rothschild, Les Misérables, Dodsworth, Dead End, A Star is Born, Of Mice and Men, Stagecoach, Wuthering Heights, Rebecca, Foreign Correspondant, The Great Dictator, The Long Voyage Home, Our Town, In Which We Serve, Since You Went Away, Spellbound, Henry V, High Noon, Moulin Rouge, Marty, Around the World in 80 Days, 12 Angry Men, Witness for the Prosecution, The Defiant Ones, Separate Tables, Elmer Gantry, West Side Story, Judgment at Nuremberg, Tom Jones, Lilies of the Field, A Thousand Clowns, The Russians are Coming the Russians are Coming, In the Heat of the Night, Midnight Cowboy, Fiddler on the Roof, Lenny, One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Rocky, Bound for Glory, Network, Annie Hall, Coming Home, Apocalypse Now, Raging Bull, Rain Man, Capote
  • Universal — 35 nominations
    • All Quiet on the Western Front, Imitation of Life, Three Smart Girls, One Hundred Men and a Girl, Anne of the Thousand Days, Airport, The Sting, American Graffiti, Jaws, The Deer Hunter, Coal Miner’s Daughter, On Golden Pond, E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, Missing, Tender Mercies, Out of Africa, Born on the Fourth of July, Field of Dreams, Scent of a Woman, Schindler’s List, In the Name of the Father, Apollo 13, Babe, Shakespeare in Love, Gladiator, Erin Brockovich, A Beautiful Mind, Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World, Seabiscuit, Ray, Munich, Frost/Nixon, Inglourious Basterds, Les Misérables, The Wolf of Wall Street
  • Miramax/Weinstein Company — 27 nominations (Includes 7 Weinstein Co. nominations, which are the six on the end.)
    • My Left Foot, The Crying Game, The Piano, Pulp Fiction, Il Postino, The English Patient, Good Will Hunting, Shakespeare in Love, Life is Beautiful, The Cider House Rules, Chocolat, In the Bedroom, Chicago, Gangs of New York, The Hours, Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World, The Aviator, Finding Neverland, The Queen, No Country for Old Men, There Will Be Blood, The Reader, Inglourious Basterds, The King’s Speech, The Artist, Django Unchained, Silver Linings Playbook, Philomena
  • RKO Radio — 19 nominations
    • Cimarron, Little Women, The Gay Divorcee, Alice Adams, The Informer, Top Hat, Stage Door, Love Affair, Kitty Foyle, Citizen Kane, The Little Foxes, Suspicion, The Magnificent Ambersons, The Pride of the Yankees, The Bells of St. Mary’s, The Best Years of Our Lives, It’s a Wonderful Life, The Bishop’s Wife, Crossfire
  • Fox Searchlight — 11 nominations
    • The Full Monty, Sideways, Little Miss Sunshine, Juno, Slumdog Millionaire, Black Swan, 127 Hours, The Descendants, The Tree of Life, Beasts of the Southern Wild, 12 Years a Slave
  • DreamWorks — 9 nominations
    • Saving Private Ryan, American Beauty, Gladiator, A Beautiful Mind, Seabiscuit, Munich, The Help, War Horse, Lincoln
  • Focus Features — 8 nominations
    • The Pianist, Lost in Translation, Brokeback Mountain, Atonement, Milk, A Serious Man, The Kids Are All Right, Dallas Buyers Club
  • Orion — 6 nominations
    • Amadeus, Platoon, Hannah and Her Sisters, Mississippi Burning, Dances with Wolves, The Silence of the Lambs
  • Sony Pictures Classics — 5 nominations
    • Howards End, Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon, An Education, Midnight in Paris, Amour
  • Touchstone Pictures — 5 nominations
    • Dead Poets Society, The Insider, The Help, War Horse, Lincoln
  • Goldwyn — 5 nominations
    • Arrowsmith, Dodsworth, Dead End, Wuthering Heights, The Pride of the Yankees
  • TriStar — 5 nominations
    • Places in the Heart, Bugsy, Jerry Maguire, As Good As It Gets, District 9
  • Avco Embassy — 4 nominations (Under Embassy and Avco Embassy)
    • Darling, The Graduate, The Lion in Winter, A Touch of Class
  • Walt Disney Pictures — 4 nominations (includes 2 Pixar nominations)
    • Mary Poppins, Beauty and the Beast, Up, Toy Story 3
  • Castle Rock Entertainment — 3 nominations
    • A Few Good Men, The Shawshank Redemption, The Green Mile
  • First National — 3 nominations
    • Five Star Final, Flirtation Walk, Four Daughters
  • Lucasfilm — 3 nominations
    • American Graffiti, Star Wars, Raiders of the Lost Ark
  • New Line Cinema — 3 nominations
    • The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring, The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers, The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King
  • Paramount Vantage — 4 nominations
    • Babel, No Country for Old Men, There Will Be Blood, Nebraska
  • PolyGram Filmed Entertainment/Gramercy — 3 nominations
    • Four Weddings and a Funeral, Fargo, Elizabeth
  • Selznick International — 3 nominations
    • Gone With the Wind, Rebecca, Since You Went Away
  • Allied Artists — 2 nominations
    • Friendly Persuasion, Cabaret
  • Caddo — 2 nominations
    • The Racket, The Front Page
  • Hollywood Pictures — 2 nominations
    • Quiz Show, The Sixth Sense
  • The Ladd Company — 2 nominations
    • Chariots of Fire, The Right Stuff
  • Lightstorm Entertainment — 2 nominations
    • Titanic, Avatar
  • Lions Gate Entertainment — 2 nominations
    • Crash, Precious: Based on the Novel “Push” by Sapphire
  • U-I — 2 nominations
    • Great Expectations, To Kill a Mockingbird
  • USA Films — 2 nominations
    • Traffic, Gosford Park
  • Wanger — 2 nominations
    • Foreign Correspondent, The Long Voyage Home
  • ABC Motion Pictures — 1 nomination
    • Prizzi’s Honor
  • Argosy — 1 nomination
    • The Long Voyage Home
  • ARP Sélection — 1 nomination
    • The Artist
  • Cinecom — 1 nomination
    • A Room with a View
  • Cinema V — 1 nomination
    • Z
  • Cinerama — 1 nomination
    • How the West Was Won
  • Chaplin — 1 nomination
    • The Great Dictator
  • Continental/British Lion Films — 1 nomination
    • Room at the Top
  • Cosmopolitan — 1 nomination
    • Captain Blood
  • EMI Films — 1 nomination
    • Tender Mercies
  • Famous Players-Lasky — 1 nomination
    • Wings
  • Feature Productions — 1 nomination
    • Alibi
  • Fine Line Features — 1 nomination
    • Shine
  • GFD — 1 nomination
    • 49th Parallel
  • Gracie Films — 1 nomination
    • Jerry Maguire
  • Icon — 1 nomination
    • Braveheart
  • Imagine Entertainment — 1 nomination
    • Apollo 13
  • Island Alive — 1 nomination
    • Kiss of the Spider Woman
  • ITC — 1 nomination
    • On Golden Pond
  • J. Arthur Rank-Two Cities Films — 1 nomination
    • Hamlet
  • Kramer — 1 nomination
    • The Defiant Ones
  • La Petite Reine — 1 nomination
    • The Artist
  • Lesser — 1 nomination
    • Our Town
  • London Films — 1 nomination
    • The Private Life of Henry VIII
  • Mercury — 1 nomination
    • The Magnificent Ambersons
  • New World Pictures — 1 nomination
    • Cries and Whispers
  • October Films — 1 nomination
    • Secrets & Lies
  • RAO/World Pictures — 1 nomination
    • Grand Illusion
  • Rank-Cineguild — 1 nomination
    • Great Expectations
  • Rank Organization/Powell and Pressburger, Eagle-Lion Films — 1 nomination
    • The Red Shoes
  • Republic — 1 nomination
    • The Quiet Man
  • Roach — 1 nomination
    • Of Mice and Men
  • Roadside Attractions — 1 nomination
    • Winter’s Bone
  • Rossen — 1 nomination
    • All the King’s Men
  • Seven Arts — 1 nomination
    • Bonnie and Clyde
  • Summit Entertainment — 1 nomination
    • The Hurt Locker
  • Working Title Films — 1 nomination
    • Les Misérables


Best Picture Winners That Also Won Best Director

  • All Quiet on the Western Front (1929-1930)
  • Cavalcade (1932-1933)
  • It Happened One Night (1934)
  • You Can’t Take It With You (1938)
  • Gone With the Wind (1939)
  • How Green Was My Valley (1941)
  • Mrs. Miniver (1942)
  • Casablanca (1943)
  • Going My Way (1944)
  • The Lost Weekend (1945)
  • The Best Years of Our Lives (1946)
  • Gentleman’s Agreement (1947)
  • All About Eve (1950)
  • From Here to Eternity (1953)
  • On the Waterfront (1954)
  • Marty (1955)
  • The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957)
  • Gigi (1958)
  • Ben-Hur (1959)
  • The Apartment (1960)
  • West Side Story (1961)
  • Lawrence of Arabia (1962)
  • Tom Jones (1963)
  • My Fair Lady (1964)
  • The Sound of Music (1965)
  • A Man for All Seasons (1966)
  • Oliver! (1968)
  • Midnight Cowboy (1969)
  • Patton (1970)
  • The French Connection (1971)
  • The Sting (1973)
  • The Godfather Part II (1974)
  • One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975)
  • Rocky (1976)
  • Annie Hall (1977)
  • The Deer Hunter (1978)
  • Kramer vs. Kramer (1979)
  • Ordinary People (1980)
  • Gandhi (1982)
  • Terms of Endearment (1983)
  • Amadeus (1984)
  • Out of Africa (1985)
  • Platoon (1986)
  • The Last Emperor (1987)
  • Rain Man (1988)
  • Dances with Wolves (1990)
  • The Silence of the Lambs (1991)
  • Unforgiven (1992)
  • Schindler’s List (1993)
  • Forrest Gump (1994)
  • Braveheart (1995)
  • The English Patient (1996)
  • Titanic (1997)
  • American Beauty (1999)
  • A Beautiful Mind (2001)
  • The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)
  • Million Dollar Baby (2004)
  • The Departed (2006)
  • No Country for Old Men (2007)
  • Slumdog Millionaire (2008)
  • The Hurt Locker (2009)
  • The King’s Speech (2010)
  • The Artist (2011)


Best Picture Winners That Also Won Best Actor:

  • It Happened One Night (1934)
  • Going My Way (1944)
  • The Lost Weekend (1945)
  • The Best Years of Our Lives (1946)
  • Hamlet (1948)
  • All the King’s Men (1949)
  • On the Waterfront (1954)
  • Marty (1955)
  • The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957)
  • Ben-Hur (1959)
  • My Fair Lady (1964)
  • A Man for All Seasons (1966)
  • In the Heat of the Night (1967)
  • Patton (1970)
  • The French Connection (1971)
  • The Godfather (1972)
  • One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975)
  • Kramer vs. Kramer (1979)
  • Gandhi (1982)
  • Amadeus (1984)
  • Rain Man (1988)
  • The Silence of the Lambs (1991)
  • Forrest Gump (1994)
  • American Beauty (1999)
  • Gladiator (2000)
  • The King’s Speech (2010)
  • The Artist (2011)


Best Picture Winners That Also Won Best Actress:

  • It Happened One Night (1934)
  • The Great Ziegfeld (1936)
  • Gone With the Wind (1939)
  • Mrs. Miniver (1942)
  • One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975)
  • Annie Hall (1977)
  • Terms of Endearment (1983)
  • Driving Miss Daisy (1989)
  • The Silence of the Lambs (1991)
  • Shakespeare in Love (1998)
  • Million Dollar Baby (2004)


Best Pictures That Also Won Best Supporting Actor:

  • The Life of Emile Zola (1937)
  • How Green Was My Valley (1941)
  • Going My Way (1944)
  • The Best Years of Our Lives (1946)
  • All About Eve (1950)
  • From Here to Eternity (1953)
  • Ben-Hur (1959)
  • West Side Story (1961)
  • The Godfather Part II (1974)
  • The Deer Hunter (1978)
  • Ordinary People (1980)
  • Terms of Endearment (1983)
  • Unforgiven (1992)
  • Million Dollar Baby (2004)
  • No Country for Old Men (2007)


Best Pictures That Also Won Best Supporting Actress:

  • Gone With the Wind (1939)
  • Mrs. Miniver (1942)
  • Gentleman’s Agreement (1947)
  • All the King’s Men (1949)
  • From Here to Eternity (1953)
  • On the Waterfront (1954)
  • West Side Story (1961)
  • Kramer vs. Kramer (1979)
  • The English Patient (1996)
  • Shakespeare in Love (1998)
  • A Beautiful Mind (2001)
  • Chicago (2002)
  • 12 Years a Slave (2013)


Best Pictures That Also Won Best Screenplay (Original or Adapted):

  • Cimarron (1930-1931)
  • It Happened One Night (1934)
  • The Life of Emile Zola (1937)
  • Gone With the Wind (1939)
  • Mrs. Miniver (1942)
  • Casablanca (1943)
  • Going My Way (1944)
  • The Lost Weekend (1945)
  • The Best Years of Our Lives (1946)
  • All About Eve (1950)
  • An American in Paris (1951)
  • From Here to Eternity (1953)
  • On the Waterfront (1954)
  • Marty (1955)
  • Around the World in 80 Days (1956)
  • The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957)
  • Gigi (1958)
  • The Apartment (1960)
  • Tom Jones (1963)
  • A Man for All Seasons (1966)
  • In the Heat of the Night (1967)
  • Midnight Cowboy (1969)
  • Patton (1970)
  • The French Connection (1971)
  • The Godfather (1972)
  • The Sting (1973)
  • The Godfather Part II (1974)
  • One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975)
  • Annie Hall (1977)
  • Kramer vs. Kramer (1979)
  • Ordinary People (1980)
  • Chariots of Fire (1981)
  • Gandhi (1982)
  • Terms of Endearment (1983)
  • Amadeus (1984)
  • Out of Africa (1985)
  • The Last Emperor (1987)
  • Rain Man (1988)
  • Driving Miss Daisy (1989)
  • Dances with Wolves (1990)
  • The Silence of the Lambs (1991)
  • Schindler’s List (1993)
  • Forrest Gump (1994)
  • Shakespeare in Love (1998)
  • American Beauty (1999)
  • A Beautiful Mind (2001)
  • The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)
  • Crash (2005)
  • The Departed (2006)
  • No Country for Old Men (2007)
  • Slumdog Millionaire (2008)
  • The Hurt Locker (2009)
  • The King’s Speech (2010)
  • Argo (2012)
  • 12 Years a Slave (2013)


Best Pictures Without Any Acting Wins:

  • Wings (1927-1928)
  • The Broadway Melody (1928-1929)
  • All Quiet on the Western Front (1929-1930)
  • Cimarron (1930-1931)
  • Grand Hotel (1931-1932)
  • Cavalcade (1932-1933)
  • Mutiny on the Bounty (1935)
  • You Can’t Take It With You (1938)
  • Rebecca (1940)
  • Casablanca (1943)
  • An American in Paris (1951)
  • The Greatest Show on Earth (1952)
  • Around the World in 80 Days (1956)
  • Gigi (1958)
  • The Apartment (1960)
  • Lawrence of Arabia (1962)
  • Tom Jones (1963)
  • The Sound of Music (1965)
  • Oliver! (1968)
  • Midnight Cowboy (1969)
  • The Sting (1973)
  • Rocky (1976)
  • Out of Africa (1985)
  • Platoon (1986)
  • The Last Emperor (1987)
  • Dances with Wolves (1990)
  • Schindler’s List (1993)
  • Braveheart (1995)
  • Titanic (1997)
  • The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)
  • The Departed (2006)
  • Slumdog Millionaire (2008)
  • The Hurt Locker (2009)
  • Argo (2012)


Best Actor & Best Actress from the Same Film:

  • It Happened One Night, 1934 (Clark Gable, Claudette Colbert)
  • One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest, 1975 (Jack Nicholson, Louise Fletcher)
  • Network, 1976 (Peter Finch, Faye Dunaway)
  • Coming Home, 1978 (Jon Voight, Jane Fonda)
  • On Golden Pond, 1981 (Henry Fonda, Katharine Hepburn)
  • The Silence of the Lambs, 1991 (Anthony Hopkins, Jodie Foster)
  • As Good As It Gets, 1997 (Jack Nicholson, Helen Hunt)


Best Actor & Best Supporting Actor from the Same Film:

  • Going My Way, 1944 (Bing Crosby, Barry Fitzgerald
  • The Best Years of Our Lives, 1946 (Frederic March, Harold Russell)
  • Ben-Hur, 1959 (Charlton Heston, Hugh Griffith)
  • Mystic River, 2003 (Sean Penn, Tim Robbins)
  • Dallas Buyers Club, 2013 (Matthew McConaughey, Jared Leto)


Best Actor & Best Supporting Actress from the Same Film:

  • All the King’s Men, 1949 (Broderick Crawford, Mercedes McCambridge)
  • On the Waterfront, 1954 (Marlon Brando, Eva Marie Saint)
  • Separate Tables, 1958 (David Niven, Wendy Hiller)
  • Elmer Gantry, 1960 (Burt Lancaster, Shirley Jones)
  • Network, 1976 (Peter Finch, Beatrice Straight)
  • Kramer vs. Kramer, 1979 (Dustin Hoffman, Meryl Streep)
  • My Left Foot, 1989 (Daniel Day-Lewis, Brenda Fricker)


Best Actress & Best Supporting Actor from the Same Film:

  • A Streetcar Named Desire, 1951 (Vivien Leigh, Karl Malden)
  • Hud, 1963 (Patricia Neal, Melvyn Douglas)
  • Terms of Endearment, 1983 (Shirley MacLaine, Jack Nicholson)
  • Million Dollar Baby, 2004 (Hilary Swank, Morgan Freeman)


Best Actress & Best Supporting Actress from the same film:

  • Jezebel, 1938 (Bette Davis, Fay Bainter)
  • Gone With the Wind, 1939 (Vivien Leigh, Hattie McDaniel)
  • Mrs. Miniver, 1942 (Greer Garson, Teresa Wright)
  • A Streetcar Named Desire, 1951 (Vivien Leigh, Kim Hunter)
  • The Miracle Worker, 1962 (Anne Bancroft, Patty Duke)
  • Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, 1966 (Elizabeth Taylor, Sandy Dennis)
  • Network, 1976 (Faye Dunaway, Beatrice Straight)
  • Moonstruck, 1987 (Cher, Olympia Dukakis)
  • The Piano, 1993 (Holly Hunter, Anna Paquin)
  • Shakespeare in Love, 1998 (Gwyneth Paltrow, Judi Dench)


Best Supporting Actor & Best Supporting Actress from the Same Film:

  • A Streetcar Named Desire, 1951 (Karl Malden, Kim Hunter)
  • From Here to Eternity, 1953 (Frank Sinatra, Donna Reed)
  • Sayonara, 1957 (Red Buttons, Miyoshi Umeki)
  • West Side Story, 1961 (George Chakiris, Rita Moreno)
  • The Last Picture Show, 1971 (Ben Johnson, Cloris Leachman)
  • Julia, 1977 (Jason Robards, Vanessa Redgrave)
  • Hannah and Her Sisters, 1986 (Michael Caine, Dianne Wiest)
  • The Fighter, 2010 (Christian Bale, Melissa Leo)


Winners Who Beat Another Nominee From the Same Film:

  • 1939, Hattie McDaniel, Gone With the Wind (Best Supporting Actress, beat Olivia de Havilland)
  • 1942, Teresa Wright, Mrs. Miniver (Best Supporting Actress, beat Dame May Whitty)
  • 1947, Celeste Holm, Gentleman’s Agreement (Best Supporting Actress, beat Anne Revere)
  • 1961, Maximilian Schell, Judgment at Nuremberg (Best Actor, beat Spencer Tracy)
  • 1970, Helen Hayes, Airport (Best Supporting Actress, beat Maureen Stapleton)
  • 1971, Ben Johnson, The Last Picture Show (Best Supporting Actor, beat Jeff Bridges)
  • 1971, Cloris Leachman, The Last Picture Show (Best Supporting Actress, beat Ellen Burstyn)
  • 1973, Tatum O’Neal, Paper Moon (Best Supporting Actress, beat Madeline Kahn)
  • 1974, Robert De Niro, The Godfather Part II (Best Supporting Actor, beat Michael V. Gazzo, Lee Strasberg)
  • 1976, Peter Finch, Network (Best Actor, beat William Holden)
  • 1977, Jason Robards, Julia (Best Supporting Actor, beat Maximilian Schell)
  • 1979, Meryl Streep, Kramer vs. Kramer (Best Supporting Actress, beat Jane Alexander)
  • 1980, Timothy Hutton, Ordinary People (Best Supporting Actor, beat Judd Hirsch)
  • 1982, Jessica Lange, Tootsie (Best Supporting Actress, beat Teri Garr)
  • 1983, Shirley MacLaine, Terms of Endearment (Best Actress, beat Debra Winger)
  • 1983, Jack Nicholson, Terms of Endearment (Best Supporting Actor, beat John Lithgow)
  • 1984, F. Murray Abraham, Amadeus (Best Actor, beat Tom Hulce)
  • 1994, Dianne Wiest, Bullets over Broadway (Best Supporting Actress, beat Jennifer Tilly)
  • 2002, Catherine Zeta-Jones, Chicago (Best Supporting Actress, beat Queen Latifah)
  • 2010, Melissa Leo, The Fighter (Best Supporting Actress, beat Amy Adams)
  • 2011, Octavia Spencer, The Help (Best Supporting Actress, beat Jessica Chastain)


Films Nominated More Than Once in an Acting Category (* = win):

  • 1935, Mutiny on the Bounty (3, Best Actor, Charles Laughton/Clark Gable/Franchot Tone)
  • 1939, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (2, Best Supporting Actor, Harry Carey/Claude Rains)
  • 1941, The Little Foxes (2, Best Supporting Actress, Patricia Collinge/Teresa Wright)
  • 1942, Mrs. Miniver (2, Best Supporting Actress, Dame May Whitty/Teresa Wright*)
  • 1943, The Song of Bernadette (2, Best Supporting Actress, Gladys Cooper/Anne Revere)
  • 1945, Mildred Pierce (2, Best Supporting Actress, Eve Arden/Ann Blyth)
  • 1947, Gentleman’s Agreement (2, Best Supporting Actress, Celeste Holm*/Anne Revere)
  • 1948, I Remember Mama (2, Best Supporting Actress, Barbara Bel Geddes/Ellen Corby)
  • 1949, Come to the Stable (2, Best Supporting Actress, Celeste Holm/Elsa Lanchester)
  • 1949, Pinky (2, Best Supporting Actress, Ethel Barrymore/Ethel Waters)
  • 1950, All About Eve (2, Best Actress, Anne Baxter/Bette Davis)
  • 1950, All About Eve (2, Best Supporting Actress, Celeste Holm/Thelma Ritter)
  • 1953, From Here to Eternity (2, Best Actor, Montgomery Clift/Burt Lancaster)
  • 1953, Shane (2, Best Supporting Actor, Brandon de Wilde/Jack Palance)
  • 1954, On the Waterfront (2, Best Supporting Actor, Lee J. Cobb/Karl Malden/Rod Steiger)
  • 1954, The High and the Mighty (2, Best Supporting Actress, Jan Sterling/Claire Trevor)
  • 1956, Giant (2, Best Actor, James Dean/Rock Hudson)
  • 1956, The Bad Seed (2, Best Supporting Actress, Eileen Heckart/Patty McCormack)
  • 1957, Peyton Place (2, Best Supporting Actor, Arthur Kennedy/Russ Tamblyn)
  • 1957, Peyton Place (2, Best Supporting Actress, Hope Lange/Diane Varsi)
  • 1958, The Defiant Ones (2, Best Actor, Tony Curtis/Sidney Poitier)
  • 1959, Anatomy of a Murder (2, Best Supporting Actor, Arthur O’Connell/George C. SCott)
  • 1959, Suddenly, Last Summer (2, Best Actress, Katharine Hepburn/Elizabeth Taylor)
  • 1959, Imitation of Life (2, Best Supporting Actress, Susan Kohner/Juanita Moore)
  • 1961, Judgment at Nuremberg (2, Best Actor, Maximilian Schell*/Spencer Tracy)
  • 1961, The Hustler (2, Best Supporting Actor, Jackie Gleason/George C. Scott)
  • 1963, Tom Jones (3, Best Supporting Actress, Diane Cilento/Edith Evans/Joyce Redman)
  • 1964, Becket (2, Best Actor, Richard Burton/Peter O’Toole)
  • 1965, Othello (2, Best Supporting Actress, Joyce Redman/Maggie Smith)
  • 1967, Bonnie and Clyde (2, Best Supporting Actor, Gene Hackman/Michael J. Pollard)
  • 1969, Midnight Cowboy (2, Best Actor, Dustin Hoffman/Jon Voight)
  • 1970, Airport (2, Best Supporting Actress, Helen Hayes*/Maureen Stapleton)
  • 1971, The Last Picture Show (2, Best Supporting Actor, Jeff Bridges/Ben Johnson*)
  • 1971, The Last Picture Show (2, Best Supporting Actress, Ellen Burstyn/Cloris Leachman*)
  • 1972, Sleuth (2, Best Actor, Michael Caine/Laurence Olivier)
  • 1972, The Godfather (3, Best Supporting Actor, James Caan/Robert Duvall/Al Pacino)
  • 1973, Paper Moon (2, Best Supporting Actress, Madeline Kahn/Tatum O’Neal*)
  • 1974, The Godfather Part II (3, Best Supporting Actor, Robert De Niro*/Michael V. Gazzo/Lee Strasberg)
  • 1975, Nashville (2, Best Supporting Actress, Ronee Blakley/Lily Tomlin)
  • 1976, Network (2, Best Actor, Peter Finch*/William Holden)
  • 1976, Rocky (2, Best Supporting Actor, Burgess Meredith/Burt Young)
  • 1977, The Turning Point (2, Best Actress, Anne Bancroft/Shirley MacLaine)
  • 1977, Julia (2, Best Supporting Actor, Jason Robards*/Maximilian Schell)
  • 1979, Kramer vs. Kramer (2, Best Supporting Actress, Jane Alexander/Meryl Streep*)
  • 1980, Ordinary People (2, Best Supporting Actor, Judd Hirsch/Timothy Hutton*)
  • 1982, Tootsie (2, Best Supporting Actress, Teri Garr/Jessica Lange)
  • 1983, The Dresser (2, Best Actor, Tom Courtenay/Albert Finney)
  • 1983, Terms of Endearment (2, Best Actress, Shirley MacLaine*/Debra Winger)
  • 1983, Terms of Endearment (2, Best Supporting Actress, John Lithgow/Jack Nicholson*)
  • 1984, Amadeus (2, Best Actor, F. Murray Abraham*/Tom Hulce)
  • 1985, The Color Purple (2, Best Supporting Actress, Margaret Avery/Oprah Winfrey)
  • 1986, Platoon (2, Best Supporting Actor, Tom Berenger/Willem Dafoe)
  • 1988, Working Girl (2, Best Supporting Actress, Joan Cusack/Sigourney Weaver)
  • 1989, Enemies, a Love Story (2, Best Supporting Actress, Anjelica Huston/Lena Olin)
  • 1991, Thelma & Louise (2, Best Actress, Geena Davis/Susan Sarandon)
  • 1991, Bugsy (2, Best Supporting Actor, Harvey Keitel/Ben Kingsley)
  • 1994, Bullets over Broadway (2, Best Supporting Actress, Jennifer Tilly/Dianne Wiest*)
  • 2000, Almost Famous (2, Best Supporting Actress, Kate Hudson/Frances McDormand)
  • 2001, Gosford Park (2, Best Supporting Actress, Helen Mirren/Maggie Smith)
  • 2002, Chicago (2, Best Supporting Actress, Queen Latifah/Catherine Zeta-Jones*)
  • 2006, Babel (2, Best Supporting Actress, Adriana Barraza/Rinko Kikuchi)
  • 2008, Doubt (2, Best Supporting Actress, Amy Adams/Viola Davis)
  • 2009, Up in the Air (2, Best Supporting Actress, Vera Farmiga/Anna Kendrick)
  • 2010, The Fighter (2, Best Supporting Actress, Amy Adams/Melissa Leo*)
  • 2011, The Help (2, Best Supporting Actress, Jessica Chastain, Octavia Spencer*)


First Oscar Winners to Be Born in the 21st Century:

  • Best Actor: 1934, Clark Gable, It Happened One Night (Born: February 1, 1901)
  • Best Actress: 1927-1928, Janet Gaynor, Seventh Heaven/Sunrise/Street Angel (Born: October 6, 1906)
  • Best Supporting Actor: 1942, Van Heflin, Jonny Eager (Born: December 13, 1910)
  • Best Supporting Actress: 1941, Mary Astor, The Great Lie (Born: May 3, 1906)
  • Best Director: 1942, William Wyler, Mrs. Miniver (Born: July 1, 1902)


Actors with Multiple Acting Oscars:

  • Frederic March, 2, Best Actor, 1931-1932, Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde, Best Actor, 1946, The Best Years of Our Lives
  • Helen Hayes, 2, Best Actress, 1931-1923, The Sin of Madelon Claudet, Best Supporting Actress, 1970, Airport
  • Katharine Hepburn, 4, Best Actress, 1932-1933, Morning Glory, Best Actress, 1967, Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner, Best Actress, 1968, The Lion in Winter, 1981, On Golden Pond
  • Bette Davis, 2, Best Actress, 1935, Dangerous, Best Actress, 1938, Jezebel
  • Luise Rainer, 2, Best Actress, 1936, The Great Ziegfeld, Best Actress, 1937, The Good Earth
  • Walter Brennan, 3, Best Supporting Actor, 1936, Come and Get It, Best Supporting Actor, 1938, Kentucky, Best Supporting Actor, 1940, The Westerner
  • Spencer Tracy, 2, Best Actor, 1937, Captains Courageous, Best Actor, 1938, Boys Town
  • Vivien Leigh, 2, Best Actress, 1939, Gone With the Wind, Best Actress, 1951, A Streetcar Named Desire
  • Gary Cooper, 2, Best Actor, 1941, Sergeant York, Best Actor, 1952, High Noon
  • Olivia de Havilland, 2, Best Actress, 1946, To Each His Own, Best Actress, 1949, The Heiress
  • Ingrid Bergman, 3, Best Actress, 1944, Gaslight, Best Actress, 1956, Anastasia, Best Supporting Actress 1974, Murder on the Orient Express
  • Anthony Quinn, 2, Best Supporting Actor, 1952, Viva Zapata!, Best Supporting Actor, 1956, Lust for Life
  • Marlon Brando, 2, Best Actor, 1954, On the Waterfront, Best Actor, 1972, The Godfather
  • Jack Lemmon, 2, Best Supporting Actor, 1955, Mister Roberts, Best Actor, 1973, Save the Tiger
  • Shelley Winters, 2, Best Supporting Actress, 1959, The Diary of Anne Frank, Best Supporting Actress, 1965, A Patch of Blue
  • Elizabeth Taylor, 2, Best Actress, 1960, BUtterfield 8, Best Actress, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?
  • Peter Ustinov, 2, Best Supporting Actor, 1960, Spartacus, Best Supporting Actor, 1964, Topkapi
  • Melvyn Douglas, 2, Best Supporting Actor, 1963, Hud, Best Supporting Actor, 1979, Being There
  • Maggie Smith, 2, Best Actress, 1969, The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, Best Supporting Actress, 1978, California Suite
  • Glenda Jackson, 2, Best Actress, 1970, Women in Love, Best Actress, 1973, A Touch of Class
  • Gene Hackman, 2, Best Actor, 1971, The French Connection, Best Supporting Actor, 1992, Unforgiven
  • Jane Fonda, 2, Best Actress, 1971, Klute, Best Actress, 1978, Coming Home
  • Robert De Niro, 2, Best Supporting Actor, 1974, The Godfather Part II, Best Actor, 1980, Raging Bull
  • Jack Nicholson, 3, Best Actor, 1975, One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest, Best Supporting Actor, 1983, Terms of Endearment, Best Actor, 1997, As Good As It Gets
  • Jason Robards, 2, Best Supporting Actor, 1976, All the President’s Men, Best Supporting Actor, 1977, Julia
  • Dustin Hoffman, 2, Best Actor, 1979, Kramer vs. Kramer, Best Actor, 1988, Rain Man
  • Sally Field, 2, Best Actress, 1979, Norma Rae, Best Actress, 1984, Places in the Heart
  • Meryl Streep, 3, Best Supporting Actress, 1979, Kramer vs. Kramer, Best Actress, 1982, Sophie’s Choice, Best Actress, 2011, The Iron Lady
  • Jessica Lange, 2, Best Supporting Actress, 1982, Tootsie, Best Actress, 1994, Blue Sky
  • Michael Caine, 2, Best Supporting Actor, 1986, Hannah and Her Sisters, Best Supporting Actor, 1999, The Cider House Rules
  • Dianne Wiest, 2, Best Supporting Actress, 1986, Hannah and Her Sisters, Best Supporting Actress, 1994, Bullets over Broadway
  • Jodie Foster, 2, Best Actress, 1988, The Accused, Best Actress, 1991, The Silence of the Lambs
  • Daniel Day-Lewis, 3, Best Actor, 1989, My Left Foot, Best Actor, 2007, No Country for Old Men, Best Actor, 2012, Lincoln
  • Denzel Washington, 2, Best Supporting Actor, 1989, Glory, Best Actor, 2001, Training Day
  • Tom Hanks, 2, Best Actor, 1993, Philadelphia, Best Actor, 1994, Forrest Gump
  • Kevin Spacey, 2, Best Supporting Actor, 1995, The Usual Suspects, Best Actor, 1999, American Beauty
  • Hilary Swank, 2, Best Actress, 1999, Boys Don’t Cry, Best Actress, 2004, Million Dollar Baby
  • Sean Penn, 2, 2003, Best Actor, Mystic River, Best Actor, 2008, Milk
  • Christoph Waltz, 2, Best Supporting Actor, 2009, Inglourious Basterds, Best Supporting Actor, 2012, Django Unchained
  • Cate Blanchett, 2, Best Supporting Actress, 2004, The Aviator, Best Actress, 2013, Blue Jasmine


Won Both Lead and Supporting:

  • Helen Hayes, Best Actress 1931-1932, The Sin of Madelon Claudet, Best Supporting Actress, 1970, Airport
  • Ingrid Bergman, Best Actress 1944, Gaslight, Best Actress 1956, Anastasia, Best Supporting Actress 1974, Murder on the Orient Express
  • Jack Lemmon, Best Supporting Actor, 1955, Mister Roberts, Best Actor, 1973, Save the Tiger
  • Maggie Smith, Best Actress, 1969, The Prime of Miss Jean Brodie, Best Supporting Actress, 1978, California Suite
  • Gene Hackman, Best Actor, 1971, The French Connection, Best Supporting Actor, 1992, Unforgiven
  • Robert De Niro, Best Supporting Actor, 1974, The Godfather Part II, Best Actor, 1980, Raging Bull
  • Jack Nicholson, Best Actor, 1975, One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest & 1997, As Goos As It Gets, Best Supporting Actor, 1983, Terms of Endearment
  • Meryl Streep, Best Supporting Actress, 1979, Kramer vs. Kramer, Best Actress, 1982, Sophie’s Choice, Best Actress, 2011, The Iron Lady
  • Jessica Lange, 1982, Best Supporting Actress, Tootsie, Best Actress, 1994, Blue Sky
  • Kevin Spacey, Best Supporting Actor, 1995, The Usual Suspects, Best Actor, 1999, American Beauty
  • Denzel Washington, Best Actor, 2001, Training Day, Best Supporting Actor, 1989, Glory
  • Cate Blanchett, Best Supporting Actress, 2004, The Aviator, Best Actress, 2013, Blue Jasmine


EGOT Winners:

  • Richard Rodgers
  • Helen Hayes
  • Rita Moreno
  • John Gielgud
  • Audrey Hepburn
  • Marvin Hamlisch
  • Jonathan Tunick
  • Mel Brooks
  • Mike Nichols
  • Whoopi Goldberg
  • Scott Rudin
  • Robert Lopez
  • Barbara Streisand (Special Tony Award)
  • Liza Minnelli (Special Grammy Award)
  • James Earl Jones (Special Academy Award)


Films Nominated in All Four Acting Categories (* = won):

  • My Man Godfrey, 1936 (William Powell, Carole Lombard, Mischa Auer, Alice Brady)
  • Mrs. Miniver, 1942 (Walter Pidgeon, Greer Garson, Henry Travers, Teresa Wright*/Dame May Whitty)
  • For Whom the Bell Tolls, 1943 (Gary Cooper, Ingrid Bergman, Akim Tamiroff, Katina Paxinou*)
  • Johnny Belinda, 1948 (Lew Ayres, Jane Wyman*, Charles Bickford, Agnes Moorehead)
  • Sunset Boulevard, 1950 (William Holden, Gloria Swanson, Erich von Stroheim, Nancy Olson)
  • A Streetcar Named Desire, 1951 (Marlon Brando, Vivien Leigh*, Karl Malden*, Kim Hunter*)
  • From Here to Eternity, 1953 (Montgomery Clift/Burt Lancaster, Deborah Kerr, Frank Sinatra*, Donna Reed*)
  • Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, 1966 (Richard Burton, Elizabeth Taylor*, George Segal, Sandy Dennis*)
  • Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner, 1967 (Spencer Tracy, Katharine Hepburn*, Cecil Kellaway, Beah Richards)
  • Bonnie and Clyde, 1967 (Warren Beatty, Faye Dunaway, Gene Hackman/Michael J. Pollard, Estelle Parsons*)
  • Network, 1976 (Peter Finch*/William Holden, Faye Dunaway*, Ned Beatty, Beatrice Straight*)
  • Coming Home, 1978 (Jon Voight*, Jane Fonda*, Bruce Dern, Penelope Milford)
  • Reds, 1981 (Warren Beatty, Diane Keaton, Jack Nicholson, Maureen Stapleton*)
  • Silver Linings Playbook, 2012 (Bradley Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence*, Robert De Niro, Jacki Weaver)
  • American Hustle, 2013 (Christian Bale, Amy Adams, Bradley Cooper, Jennifer Lawrence)


Male Acting Oscars Considered Makeup/Career/Veteran Oscars:

  • James Stewart (1940, Best Actor, The Philadelphia Story. Makeup)
  • Harold Russell (1946, Best Supporting Actor, The Best Years of Our Lives. Literally a veteran Oscar)
  • Ronald Colman (1947, Best Actor A Double Life. Career)
  • Humphrey Bogart (1951, Best Actor, The African Queen. Career)
  • David Niven (1958, Best Actor, Separate Tables. Career)
  • John Wayne (1969, Best Actor, True Grit. Career)
  • Ben Johnson (1971, Best Supporting Actor, The Last Picture Show. Veteran)
  • Jack Lemmon (1973, Best Actor, Save the Tiger. Makeup)
  • John Houseman (1973, Best Supporting Actor, The Paper Chase. Veteran/Career)
  • Art Carney (1974, Best Actor, Harry and Tonto. Veteran)
  • George Burns (1975, Best Supporting Actor, The Sunshine Boys. Veteran)
  • Faye Dunaway (1976, Best Actress, Network. Makeup. To an extent)
  • Melvyn Douglas (1963, Best Supporting Actor, Being There. Veteran)
  • Henry Fonda (1981, Best Actor, On Golden Pond. Career)
  • John Gielgud (1981, Best Actor, Arthur. Career)
  • Don Ameche (1985, Best Supporting Actor, Cocoon. Veteran/Career)
  • Paul Newman (1986, Best Actor, The Color of Money. Makeup/Career)
  • Sean Connery (1987, Best Actor, The Untouchables. Career)
  • Jack Palance (1991, Best Supporting Actor, City Slickers. Veteran/Career)
  • Al Pacino (1992, Best Actor, Scent of a Woman. Makeup/Career)
  • James Coburn (1998, Best Supporting Actor, Affliction. Veteran/Career)
  • Michael Caine (1999, Best Supporting Actor, The Cider House Rules. Veteran/Career)
  • Denzel Washington (2001, Best Actor, Training Day. Makeup)
  • Morgan Freeman (2004, Best Supporting Actor, Million Dollar Baby. Career)
  • Alan Arkin (2006, Best Supporting Actor, Little Miss Sunshine. Career)
  • Jeff Bridges (2009, Best Actor, Crazy Heart. Career)
  • Christopher Plummer (2011, Best Supporting Actor, Beginners. Career)


Female Acting Oscars Considered Makeup/Career/Veteran Oscars:

  • Bette Davis (1935, Best Actress, Dangerous. Makeup)
  • Joan Fontaine (1941, Best Actress, Suspicion. Makeup)
  • Ingrid Bergman (1944, Best Actress, Gaslight. Makeup)
  • Ethel Barrymore (1944, Best Supporting Actress, None but the Lonely Heart. Veteran/Career)
  • Shirley Booth (1952, Best Actress, Come Back, Little Sheba. Veteran)
  • Wendy Hiller (1958, Best Supporting Actress, Separate Tables. Veteran/Career)
  • Elizabeth Taylor (1960, Best Actress, BUtterfield 8. Career (They thought she was dying.))
  • Margaret Rutherford (1963, Best Supporting Actress, The V.I.P.s. Veteran)
  • Katharine Hepburn (1967, Best Actress, Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner, 1968, Best Actress, The Lion in Winter, and 1981, Best Actress, On Golden Pond. Career)
  • Ruth Gordon (1968, Best Supporting Actress, Rosemary’s Baby. Veteran)
  • Helen Hayes (1970, Best Supporting Actress, Airport. Veteran/Career)
  • Eileen Heckart (1972, Best Supporting Actress, Butterflies are Free. Veteran)
  • Ingrid Bergman (1974, Best Supporting Actress, Murder on the Orient Express. Career)
  • Shirley MacLaine (1983, Best Actress, Terms of Endearment. Makeup)
  • Peggy Ashcroft (1984, Best Supporting Actress, A Passage to India. Veteran/Career)
  • Geraldine Page (1985, Best Actress, The Trip to Bountiful. Veteran/Career)
  • Jessica Tandy (1989, Best Actress, Driving Miss Daisy. Veteran)
  • Whoopi Goldberg (1990, Best Supporting Actress, Ghost. Makeup)
  • Jessica Lange (1994, Best Actress, Blue Sky. Makeup)
  • Renée Zellweger (2003, Best Supporting Actress, Cold Mountain. Makeup)
  • Helen Mirren (2006, Best Actress, The Queen. Veteran)
  • Kate Winslet (2008, Best Actress, The Reader. Makeup)
  • Meryl Streep (2011, Best Actress, The Iron Lady. “Let’s get Meryl another Oscar”)


  • Most nominations:
    • Overall: Meryl Streep (18), Jack Nicholson (12)
    • Best Actor: Spencer Tracy (9), Laurence Olivier (9)
    • Best Actress: Meryl Streep (15)
    • Best Supporting Actor: Jack Nicholson (4), Claude Rains (4), Arthur Kennedy (4), Walter Brennan (4)
    • Best Supporting Actress: Thelma Ritter (6)
  • Most nominations in a single category without winning:
    • Best Actor: Peter O’Toole (8)
    • Best Actress: Deborah Kerr (6)
    • Best Supporting Actor: Claude Rains (4), Arthur Kennedy (4)
    • Best Supporting Actress: Thelma Ritter (6)


Most Best Actor nominations:

  • Spencer Tracy, 9 nominations (2 wins)
  • Laurence Olivier, 9 nominations (1 win)
  • Jack Nicholson, 8 nominations (3 wins, 1 Supporting)
  • Paul Newman, 8 nominations (1 win)
  • Peter O’Toole, 8 nominations (0 wins)
  • Marlon Brando, 7 nominations (2 wins)
  • Dustin Hoffman, 7 nominations (2 wins)
  • Jack Lemmon, 7 nominations (2 wins, 1 Supporting)
  • Paul Muni, 6 nominations (1 win)
  • Richard Burton, 6 nominations (0 wins)
  • Gary Cooper, 5 nominations (2 wins)
  • Tom Hanks, 5 nominations (2 wins)
  • Sean Penn, 5 nominations (2 wins)
  • James Stewart, 5 nominations (1 win)
  • Gregory Peck, 5 nominations (1 win)
  • Al Pacino, 5 nominations (1 win)
  • Daniel Day-Lewis, 5 nominations (3 wins)
  • Burt Lancaster, 4 nominations (1 win)
  • Albert Finney, 4 nominations (no wins)
  • Denzel Washington, 4 nominations (1 win)


Most Best Actress Nominations:

  • Meryl Streep, 15 nominations (2 wins, 1 Supporting)
  • Katharine Hepburn, 12 nominations (4 wins)
  • Bette Davis, 10 nominations (2 wins)
  • Greer Garson, 7 nominations (1 win)
  • Ingrid Bergman, 6 nominations (3 wins, 1 Supporting)
  • Jane Fonda, 6 nominations (2 wins)
  • Deborah Kerr, 6 nominations (0 wins)
  • Norma Shearer, 6 nominations (1 win)
  • Sissy Spacek, 6 nominations (1 win)
  • Anne Bancroft, 5 nominations (1 win)
  • Ellen Burstyn, 5 nominations (1 win)
  • Irene Dunne, 5 nominations (0 wins)
  • Susan Hayward, 5 nominations (1 win)
  • Audrey Hepburn, 5 nominations (1 win)
  • Jessica Lange, 5 nominations (2 wins, 1 Supporting)
  • Shirley MacLaine, 5 nominations (1 win)
  • Susan Sarandon, 5 nominations (1 win)
  • Elizabeth Taylor, 5 nominations (2 wins)
  • Julie Christie, 4 nominations (1 win)
  • Olivia de Havilland, 4 nominations (2 wins)
  • Judi Dench, 4 nominations (1 win, Supporting)
  • Glenda Jackson, 4 nominations (2 wins)
  • Jennifer Jones, 4 nominations (1 win)
  • Diane Keaton, 4 nominations (1 win)
  • Marsha Mason, 4 nominations (0 wins)
  • Geraldine Page, 4 nominations (1 win)
  • Vanessa Redgrave, 4 nominations (1 win, Supporting)
  • Rosalind Russell, 4 nominations (0 wins)
  • Barbara Stanwck, 4 nominations (0 wins)
  • Kate Winslet, 4 nominations (1 win)
  • Joanne Woodward, 4 nominations (1 win)
  • Jane Wyman, 4 nominations (1 win)


Age-Related Shit:

  • Oldest Best Actor winner: Henry Fonda, age 76 (1981, On Golden Pond)
  • Oldest Best Actor nominee: Richard Farnsworth, age 79 (1999, The Straight Story)
  • Oldest Best Actress winner: Jessica Tandy, age 80 (1989, Driving Miss Daisy)
  • Oldest Best Actress nominee: Emmanuelle Riva, age 85 (2012, Amour)
  • Oldest Best Supporting Actor winner: Christopher Plummer, age 82 (2011, Beginners)
  • Oldest Best Supporting Actor nominee: Hal Holbrook, age 82 (2007, Into the Wild)
  • Oldest Best Supporting Actress winner: Peggy Ashcroft, age 77 (1984, The Trip to Bountiful)
  • Oldest Best Supporting Actress nominee: Gloria Stuart, age 87 (1997, Titanic)
  • Oldest Best Actor winner: Clint Eastwood, age 74 (2004, Million Dollar Baby)
  • Oldest Best Director nominee: John Huston, age 79 (1985, Prizzi’s Honor)
  • Youngest Best Actor winner: Adrien Brody, age 29 (2002, The Pianist)
  • Youngest Best Actor nominee: Jackie Cooper, age 9 (1930-1931, Skippy)
  • Youngest Best Actress winner: Marlee Matlin, age 21 (1986, Children of a Lesser God)
  • Youngest Best Actress nominee: Quvenzhané Wallis, age 9 (2012, Beasts of the Southern Wild)
  • Youngest Best Supporting Actor winner: Timothy Hutton, age 20 (1980, Ordinary People)
  • Youngest Best Supporting Actor nominee: Justin Henry, age 8 (1979, Kramer vs. Kramer)
  • Youngest Best Supporting Actress winner: Tatum O’Neal, age 10 (1973, Paper Moon)
  • Youngest Best Supporting Actress nominee: Tatum O’Neal, age 10 (1973, Paper Moon)
  • Youngest Best Director winner: Norman Taurog, age 32 (1930-1931, Skippy)
  • Youngest Best Director nominee: John Singleton, age 24 (1991, Boyz N the Hood)
  • Longest Period Between First and last win/nomination: 48 years, Katharine Hepburn (1933, Morning Glory to 1981, On Golden Pond); 40 years, Henry Fonda (1940, The Grapes of Wrath, 1981, On Golden Pond)
  • Youngest Honorary Academy Award winner: Shirley Temple, 6 years old.
  • Oldest Honorary Academy Award winners: Male — Robert F. Boyle, 98 years old (for “acting,” it’s Eli Wallach, 94 years old); Female — Angela Lansbury, 88 years old


Race-Related Shit — Black Actors nominated for Oscars (* = win):

  • 1939, Hattie McDaniel, Best Supporting Actor, Gone With the Wind *
  • 1949, Ethel Waters, Best Supporting Actress Pinky
  • 1954, Dorothy Dandridge, Best Actress, Carmen Jones
  • 1958, Sidney Potier, Best Actor, The Defiant Ones
  • 1959, Juanita Moore, Best Supporting Actress, Imitation of Life
  • 1963, Sidney Poitier, Best Actor, Lilies of the Field *
  • 1967, Beah Richards, Best Supporting Actress, Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner
  • 1968, Rupert Crosse, Best Supporting Actor, The Reviers
  • 1970, James Earl Jones, Best Actor, The Great White Hope
  • 1972, Paul Winfield, Best Actor, Sounder
  • 1972, Diana Ross, Best Actress, Lady Sings the Blues
  • 1972, Cicely Tyson, Best Actress, Sounder
  • 1964, Diahann Caroll, Best Actress, Claudine
  • 1981, Howard Rollins, Best Supporting Actor, Ragtime
  • 1982, Louis Gossett, Jr., Best Supporting Actor, An Officer and a Gentleman *
  • 1983, Alfre Woodard, Best Supporting Actress, Cross Creek
  • 1984, Adolph Caesar, Best Supporting Actress, A Soldier’s Story
  • 1985, Margaret Avery, Best Supporting Actress, The Color Purple
  • 1985, Whoopi Goldberg, Best Actress, The Color Purple
  • 1985, Oprah Winfrey, Best Supporting Actress, The Color Purple
  • 1986, Dexter Gordon, Best Actor, Round Midnight
  • 1987, Morgan Freeman, Street Smart
  • 1987, Denzel Washington, Cry Freedom
  • 1989, Morgan Freeman, Best Actor, Driving Miss Daisy
  • 1989, Denzel Washington, Glory *
  • 1992, Jaye Davidson, Best Supporting Actress The Crying Game
  • 1992, Denzel Washington, Best Actor, Malcolm X
  • 1993, Laurence Fishburne, Best Actor, What’s Love Got to Do with It
  • 1993, Angela Bassett, Best Actress, What’s Love Got to Do with It
  • 1994, Morgan Freeman, Best Actor, The Shawshank Redemption
  • 1994, Samuel L. Jackson, Best Supporting Actress, Pulp Fiction
  • 1996, Cuba Gooding, Jr., Jerry Maguire *
  • 1996, Marianne Jean-Baptiste, Secrets & Lies
  • 1999, Michael Clarke Duncan, The Green Mile
  • 1999, Denzel Washington, Best Actor, The Hurricane
  • 2001, Will Smith, Best Actor, Ali
  • 2001, Denzel Washington, Best Actor, Training Day *
  • 2001, Halle Berry, Best Actress, Monster’s Ball *
  • 2002, Queen Latifah, Best Supporting Actress, chicago
  • 2003, Djimon Hounsou, In America
  • 2004, Don Cheadle, Best Actor, Hotel Rwanda
  • 2004, Jamie Foxx, Best Actor, Ray *
  • 2004, Jamie Foxx, Best Supporting Actor, Collateral
  • 2004, Morgan Freeman, Best Supporting Actor, Million Dollar Baby *
  • 2004, Sophie Okonedo, Best Supporting Actress, Hotel Rwanda
  • 2005, Terrence Howard, Best Actor, Hustle & Flow
  • 2006, Djimon Hounsou, Best Supporting Actor, Blood Diamond
  • 2006, Jennifer Hudson, Best Supporting Actress, Dreamgirls *
  • 2006, Eddie Murphy, Best Supporting Actor, Dreamgirls
  • 2006, Will Smith, Best Actor, The Pursuit of Happyness
  • 2006, Forest Whitaker, Best Actor, The Last King of Scotland *
  • 2007, Ruby Dee, Best Supporting Actress, American Gangster
  • 2008, Viola Davis, Best Supporting Actress, Doubt
  • 2008, Taraji P. Henson, Best Supporting Actress, The Curious Case of Benjamin Button
  • 2009, Morgan Freeman, Best Actor, Invictus
  • 2009, Gabourey Sidibe, Best Actress, Precious: Based on the Novel “Push” by Sapphire
  • 2009, Mo’Nique, Best Supporting Actress, Precious: Based on the Novel “Push” by Sapphire *
  • 2011, Viola Davis, Best Actress, The Help
  • 2011, Octavia Spencer, Best Supporting Actress, The Help *
  • 2012, Denzel Washington, Best Actor, Flight
  • 2012, Quvenzhané Wallis, Best Actress, Beasts of the Southern Wild
  • 2013, Chiwetel Ejiofor, Best Actor, 12 Years a Slave
  • 2013, Barkhad Abdi, Best Supporting Actor, Captain Phillips
  • 2013, Lupita Nyong’o, Best Supporting Actress, 12 Years a Slave *


Shortest Oscar-Winning Performances:

  • Best Actor: 1958, David Niven, Separate Tables (approximately 15 minutes, 38 seconds of screen time)
  • Best Actress: No one’s ever officially clocked the performances, so there’s no general consensus, but if I have to guess, I’d say the major suspects are Luise Rainer in The Great Ziegfeld (1936), Nicole Kidman in The Hours (2002), and Frances McDormand in Fargo (1996). I’d be willing to wager the answer is one of those.
  • Best Supporting Actor: Also never officially clocked, but the general consensus is Anthony Quinn in Lust for Life (1956). Most people clock that at about 8 minutes.
  • Best Supporting Actress: 1976, Beatrice Straight, Network (approximately 5 minutes, 40 seconds of screen time).


Posthumous acting nominees:

  • 1929, Jeanne Eagels, The Letter (while there were no official nominees this year, it’s widely agreed she was in contention among an unofficial set of nominees)
  • 1955 & 1956, James Dean, East of Eden & Giant (only person two be nominated for two posthumous Oscars)
  • 1967, Spencer Tracy, Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner
  • 1976, Peter Finch, Network (only posthumous Best Actor winner, and one of two posthumous Oscar winners)
  • 1984, Ralph Richardson, Greystroke: The Legend of Tarzan
  • 1995, Massimo Troisi, Il Postino
  • 2008, Heath Ledger, The Dark Knight (one of two posthumous Oscar winners)


Best Picture Nominees Matching the Best Director Nominees:

  • 1957 — 12 Angry Men, The Bridge on the River Kwai, Peyton Place, Sayonara, Witness for the Prosecution
  • 1964 — Becket, Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb, Mary Poppins, My Fair Lady, Zorba the Greek
  • 1981 — Atlantic City, Chariots of Fire, Reds, On Golden Pond, Raiders of the Lost Ark
  • 2005 — Brokeback Mountain, Capote, Crash, Good Night and Good Luck, Munich
  • Note: This also happened in 1931-1932, 1932-1933, 1934, 1935, 1937, 1939, 1940, 1941, 1942, 1943, 2009, 2010, 2011, 2012 and 2013, but those lists had more than five nominees. It’s much easier to pull off when you only have to go 5 for 10 (or even 12) instead of 5 for 5.


Directors Who Directed the Most Best Picture Nominees:

  • William Wyler, 13 Best Picture nominees
    • Dodsworth, Dead End, Jezebel, Wuthering Heights, The Letter, The Little Foxes, Mrs. Miniver, The Best Years of Our Lives, The Heiress, Roman Holiday, Friendly Persuasion, Ben-Hur, Funny Girl) and 3 winners (Mrs. Miniver, The Best Years of Our Lives, Ben-Hur
  • John Ford, 9 Best Picture nominees
    • Arrowsmith, The Informer, Stagecoach, The Grapes of Wrath, The Long Voyage Home, How Green Was My Valley, The Quiet Man, Mister Roberts, How the West Was Won (segment)
  • Steven Spielberg, 9 Best Picture nominees
    • Jaws, Raiders of the Lost Ark, E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial, The Color Purple, Schindler’s List, Saving Private Ryan, Munich, War Horse, Lincoln
  • Mervyn LeRoy, 8 Best Picture nominees
    • Five Star Final, I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang, Anthony Adverse, Blossoms in the Dust, Random Harvest, Madame Curie, Quo Vadis, Mister Roberts
  • Martin Scorsese, 8 Best Picture nominees
    • Taxi Driver, Raging Bull, Goodfellas, Gangs of New York, The Aviator, The Departed, Hugo, The Wolf of Wall Street
  • Frank Capra, 7 Best Picture nominees
    • Lady for a Day, It Happened One Night, Mr. Deeds Goes to Town, Lost Horizon, You Can’t Take It With You, Mr. Smith Goes to Washington, It’s a Wonderful Life
  • George Cukor, 7 Best Picture nominees
    • Little Women, David Copperfield, Romeo and Juliet, The Philadelphia Story, Gaslight, Born Yesterday, My Fair Lady
  • Henry King, 7 Best Picture nominees
    • State Fair, In Old Chicago, Alexander’s Ragtime Band, The Song of Bernadette, Wilson, Twelve O’Clock High, Love is a Many-Splendored Thing
  • George Stevens, 7 Best Picture nominees
    • Alice Adams, The Talk of the Town, The More the Merrier, A Place in the Sun, Shane, Giant, The Diary of Anne Frank
  • Michael Curtiz, 6 Best Picture nominees
    • Captain Blood, The Adventures of Robin Hood, Four Daughters, Yankee Doodle Dandy, Casablanca, Mildred Pierce
  • David Lean, 6 Best Picture nominees
    • In Which We Serve, Great Expectations, The Bridge on the River Kwai, Lawrence of Arabia, Doctor Zhivago, A Passage to India
  • Sam Wood, 6 Best Picture nominees
    • Goodbye Mr. Chips, Kitty Foyle, Our Town, The Pride of the Yankees, For Whom the Bell Tolls, The Yearling
  • Fred Zinnemann, 6 Best Picture nominees
    • High Noon, From Here to Eternity, The Nun’s Story, The Sundowners, A Man for All Seasons, Julia
  • Billy Wilder, 5 Best Picture nominees
    • Double Indemnity, The Lost Weekend, Sunset Boulevard, Witness for the Prosecution, The Apartment
  • Francis Ford Coppola, 5 Best Picture nominees
    • The Godfather, The Conversation, The Godfather Part II, Apocalypse Now, The Godfather Part III
  • Norman Jewison, 5 Best Picture nominees
    • The Russians are Coming the Russians are Coming, In the Heat of the Night, Fiddler on the Roof, A Soldier’s Story, Moonstruck
  • Ernst Lubitsch, 5 Best Picture nominees
    • The Patriot, One Hour with You, The Smiling Lieutenant, Ninotchka, Heaven Can Wait
  • Leo McCarey, 5 Best Picture nominees
    • Ruggles of Red Gap, The Awful Truth, Love Affair, Going My Way, The Bells of St. Mary’s
  • Lewis Milestone, 5 Best Picture nominees
    • The Racket, All Quiet on the Western Front, The Front Page, Of Mice and Men, Mutiny on the Bounty


Actors Who Won an Oscar for Their Debut Film:

  • Gale Sondergaard, 1936, Best Supporting Actress, Anthony Adverse
  • Katina Paxinou, 1943, Best Supporting Actress, For Whom the Bell Tolls
  • Harold Russell, 1946, Best Supporting Actor, The Best Years of Our Lives
  • Mercedes McCambridge, 1949, Best Supporting Actress, All the King’s Men
  • Shirley Booth, 1952, Best Actress, Come Back, Little Sheba
  • Eva Marie Saint, 1954, Best Supporting Actress, On the Waterfront
  • Jo Van Fleet, 1955, Best Supporting Actress, East of Eden
  • Julie Andrews, 1964, Best Actress, Mary Poppins
  • Barbra Streisand, 1968, Best Actress, Funny Girl
  • Tatum O’Neal, 1973, Best Supporting Actress, Paper Moon
  • Haing S. Ngor, 1984, Best Supporting Actor, The Killing Fields
  • Marlee Matlin 1986, Best Actress, Children of a Lesser God
  • Anna Paquin, 1993, Best Supporting Actress, The Piano
  • Jennifer Hudson, 2006, Best Supporting Actress, Dreamgirls
  • Lupita Nyong’o, 2013, Best Supporting Actress, 12 Years a Slave


Directors Who Won Best Director for Their Debut Film:

  • Delbert Mann, Marty (1955)
  • Jerome Robbins, West Side Story (1961, shared with Robert Wise)
  • Robert Redford, Ordinary People (1980)
  • James L. Brooks, Terms of Endearment (1983)
  • Kevin Costner, Dances with Wolves (1990)
  • Sam Mendes, American Beauty (1999)


Directors Who Were Nominated For Best Director For Their Debut Film:

  • Orson Welles, Citizen Kane (1941)
  • Sidney Lumet, 12 Angry Men (1957)
  • Jack Clayon, Room at the Top (1959)
  • Frank Perry, David and Lisa (1962)
  • Mike Nichols, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966)
  • Warren Beatty/Buck Henry, Heaven Can Wait (1978)
  • Rob Marshall, Chicago (2002)
  • Bennett Miller, Capote (2005)
  • Paul Haggis, Crash (2005)
  • Benh Zeitlin, Beasts of the Southern Wild (2012)


Actors Who Won Oscars Playing Real People Who Were Alive at the Time of the Ceremony:

  • 1938, Spencer Tracy, Boys Town (Father Flanagan)
  • 1941, Gary Cooper, Sergeant York (Alvin York)
  • 1947, Edmund Gwenn, Miracle on 34th Street (Kris Kringle)
  • 1962, Patty Duke, The Miracle Worker (Helen Keller)
  • 1967, Estelle Parsons, Bonnie and Clyde (Blanche Barrow)
  • 1976, Jason Robards, All the President’s Men (Ben Bradlee)
  • 1980, Robert De Niro, Raging Bull (Jake LaMotta)
  • 1980, Sissy Spacek, Coal Miner’s Daughter (Loretta Lynn)
  • 1984, Haing S. Ngor, The Killing Fields (Dith Pran)
  • 1990, Jeremy Irons, Reversal of Fortune (Claus von Bülow)
  • 1995, Susan Sarandon, Dead Man Walking (Sister Helen Prejean)
  • 1996, Geoffrey Rush, Shine (David Helfgott)
  • 2000, Julia Roberts, Erin Brockovich (Frank Stallone)
  • 2001, Jim Broadbent, Iris (John Bayley)
  • 2001, Jennifer Connelly, A Beautiful Mind (Alicia Nash)
  • 2002, Chris Cooper, Adaptation. (John LaRoche)
  • 2006, Helen Mirren, The Queen (Queen Elizabeth II)
  • 2009, Sandra Bullock, The Blind Side (Leigh Anne Tuohy)
  • 2010, Christian Bale, The Fighter (Dicky Eklund)
  • 2010, Melissa Leo The Fighter (Alice Ward)
  • 2011, Meryl Streep, The Iron Lady (Margaret Thatcher)


The “Hat Trick”: Winning for Producing, Directing and Writing a Film:

  • Leo McCarey, Going My Way (1944)
  • Billy Wilder, The Apartment (1960)
  • Francis Ford, Coppola, The Godfather Part II (1974)
  • James L. Brooks, Terms of Endearment (1983)
  • Peter Jackson, The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003)
  • Joel & Ethan Coen, No Country for Old Men (2007)


Best Picture Winners That Were the Highest-Grossing Films of Their Year:

  • The Broadway Melody (1929)
  • It Happened One Night (1934)
  • You Can’t Take It With You (1938)
  • Gone With the Wind (1939)
  • Possibly Mrs. Miniver (1942). Bambi was #1 that year, but it’s so hard to pinpoint just how much the Disney movies actually made in their initial run. Bambi was probably #1 that year, but I wanted to establish that it’s possible some #2 runners-up behind Disney films might have actually been #1. I’ll just mention them.
  • Possibly (and maybe even probably) The Best Years of Our Lives (1946). Song of the South is #1 for that year, but some of that money is definitely from reissues.
  • Probably not The Greatest Show on Earth (1952). Even though This Is Cinerama‘s figures are way too high for just 1952, I’d wager that it was without-a-doubt the number one film for that year.
  • The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957)
  • Ben-Hur (1959)
  • Possibly West Side Story (1961). One Hundred and One Dalmatians was #1 that year.
  • Lawrence of Arabia (1962)
  • My Fair Lady (1964)
  • The Sound of Music (1965)
  • The Godfather (1972)
  • Rocky (1976)
  • Kramer vs. Kramer (1979)
  • Rain Man (1988)
  • Forrest Gump (1994). Lion King actually beat it, but apparently it’s overtaken it since then. But if we count the 3D release, then Lion King is back on top. Honestly, I say no on this one. I say it’s Lion King.
  • Titanic (1997)
  • The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003). Eventually. It got released too late to really count, but now it’s #1.

– – – – –

Best Picture Nominees That Were the Highest-Grossing Films of Their Year (Not Counting Winners):

  • Shanghai Express (1932). Grand Hotel was second.
  • Top Hat (1935)
  • San Francisco (1936)
  • Sergeant York (1941). How Green Was My Valley was second.
  • For Whom the Bell Tolls (1943)
  • The Bells of St. Mary’s (1945)
  • Possibly Born Yesterday (1950). Cinderella is #1, but who knows if that’s actually the case.
  • Quo Vadis (1951)
  • Possibly The Robe (1953). Peter Pan was #1 from that year.
  • Possibly (though probably not, like most of these Disney years) Mister Roberts (1955). Lady and the Tramp was #1 that year.
  • The Ten Commandments (1956). Around the World in 80 Days was second.
  • Cleopatra (1963)
  • Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966)
  • The Graduate (1967)
  • Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969). Midnight Cowboy was second.
  • Love Story (1970). Also of note, four of the five Best Picture nominees were the top four grossing films of that year. AirportMASH and Patton were #2, #3 and #4, respectively, for 1970. Five Easy Pieces was #16.
  • Fiddler on the Roof (1971). The French Connection was second.
  • The Exorcist (1973). The Sting was second.
  • Jaws (1975)
  • Star Wars (1977)
  • Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981)
  • E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982)
  • Ghost (1990)
  • Avatar (2009)
  • Toy Story 3 (2010)

– – – – –

Best Picture Winners by Run Time (shortest to longest):

  1. Marty, 1955, 90 minutes
  2. Annie Hall, 1977, 93 minutes
  3. Driving Miss Daisy, 1989, 99 minutes
  4. The Artist, 2011, 100 minutes
  5. The Broadway Melody, 1929, 100 minutes
  6. The Lost Weekend, 1945, 101 minutes
  7. Casablanca, 1942 (won for 1943), 102 minutes
  8. The French Connection, 1971, 104 minutes
  9. It Happened One Night, 1934, 105 minutes
  10. Kramer vs. Kramer, 1979, 105 minutes
  11. On the Waterfront, 1954, 108 minutes
  12. In the Heat of the Night, 109 minutes
  13. All the King’s Men, 1949, 110 minutes
  14. Cavalcade, 1933, 110 minutes
  15. Crash, 2005, 112 minutes
  16. Grand Hotel, 1932, 112 minutes
  17. An American in Paris, 1951, 113 minutes
  18. Chicago, 2002, 113 minutes
  19. Midnight Cowboy, 1969, 113 minutes
  20. Gigi, 1958, 115 minutes
  21. The Life of Emile Zola, 1937, 116 minutes
  22. From Here to Eternity, 1953, 118 minutes
  23. Gentleman’s Agreement, 1947, 118 minutes
  24. How Green Was My Valley, 1941, 118 minutes
  25. The King’s Speech, 2010, 118 minutes
  26. The Silence of the Lambs, 1991, 118 minutes
  27. Rocky, 1976, 119 minutes
  28. A Man for All Seasons, 1966, 120 minutes
  29. Platoon, 1986, 120 minutes
  30. Slumdog Millionaire, 2008, 120 minutes
  31. Argo, 2012, 120 minutes
  32. American Beauty, 1999, 122 minutes
  33. No Country for Old Men, 2007, 122 minutes
  34. Cimarron, 1931, 123 minutes
  35. Shakespeare in Love, 1998, 123 minutes
  36. Chariots of Fire, 1981, 124 minutes
  37. Ordinary People, 1980, 124 minutes
  38. The Apartment, 1960, 125 minutes
  39. Going My Way, 1944, 126 minutes
  40. You Can’t Take It With You, 1938, 126 minutes
  41. Tom Jones, 1963, 128 minutes
  42. The Sting, 1973, 129 minutes
  43. Rebecca, 1940, 130 minutes
  44. The Hurt Locker, 2009, 131 minutes
  45. Terms of Endearment, 1983, 131 minutes
  46. Unforgiven, 1992, 131 minutes
  47. Million Dollar Baby, 2004, 132 minutes
  48. Mutiny on the Bounty, 1935, 132 minutes
  49. One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest, 1975, 133 minutes
  50. Rain Man, 1988, 133 minutes
  51. 12 Years a Slave, 2013, 134 minutes
  52. Mrs. Miniver, 1942, 134 minutes
  53. A Beautiful Mind, 2001, 135 minutes
  54. All About Eve, 1950, 138 minutes
  55. All Quiet on the Western Front, 1930, 138 minutes
  56. Wings, 1927, 141 minutes
  57. Forrest Gump, 142 minutes
  58. The Departed, 2006, 151 minutes
  59. The Greatest Show on Earth, 1952, 152 minutes
  60. West Side Story, 1961, 152 minutes
  61. Oliver!, 1968, 153 minutes
  62. Gladiator, 2000, 155 minutes
  63. Hamlet, 1948, 155 minutes
  64. Amadeus, 1984, 160 minutes
  65. The Bridge on the River Kwai, 1957, 161 minutes
  66. Out of Africa, 1985, 161 minutes
  67. The English Patient, 1996, 162 minutes
  68. The Last Emperor, 1987, 163 minutes
  69. My Fair Lady, 1964, 170 minutes
  70. The Best Years of Our Lives, 1946, 172 minutes
  71. Patton, 1970, 172 minutes
  72. The Sound of Music, 1965, 174 minutes
  73. The Godfather, 1972, 175 minutes
  74. The Great Ziegfeld, 1936, 176 minutes
  75. Braveheart, 1995, 177 minutes
  76. Dances with Wolves, 1990, 181 minutes
  77. The Deer Hunter, 1978, 182 minutes
  78. Around the World in 80 Days, 1956, 183 minutes
  79. Gandhi, 1982, 191 minutes
  80. Titanic, 1997, 194 minutes
  81. Schindler’s List, 1993, 195 minutes
  82. The Godfather Part II, 1974, 200 minutes
  83. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King, 2003, 201 minutes
  84. Ben-Hur, 1959, 212 minutes
  85. Lawrence of Arabia, 1962, 216 minutes
  86. Gone With the Wind, 1939, 238 minutes


Best Picture Nominees by Run Time (* = winner):

Under 90 minutes:

  • She Done Him Wrong (1932-1933), 66 min
  • Chang: A Drama of the Wilderness (1927-1928), 69 min
  • The Ox-Bow Incident (1943), 75 min
  • One Hour with You (1931-1932), 80 min
  • Shanghai Express (1931-1932), 80 min
  • The White Parade (1934), 80 min
  • Wake Island (1942), 82 min
  • One Night of Love (1934), 83 min
  • Beauty and the Beast (1991), 84 min
  • The Divorcee (1929-1930), 84 min
  • The Racket (1927-1928), 84 min
  • Three Smart Girls (1936), 84 min
  • A Farewell to Arms (1932-1933), 85 min
  • High Noon (1952), 85 min
  • One Hundred Men and a Girl (1937), 85 min
  • Skippy (1930-1931), 85 min
  • Crossfire (1947), 86 min
  • The Big House (1929-1930), 87 min
  • The Champ (1931-1932), 87 min
  • Here Comes the Navy (1934), 87 min
  • Love Affair (1939), 87 min
  • The Pied Piper (1942), 87 min
  • The Story of Louis Pasteur (1936), 87 min
  • The House of Rothschild (1934), 88 min
  • The Magnificent Ambersons (1942), 88 min
  • Five Star Final (1931-1932), 89 min
  • 42nd Street (1932-1933), 89 min
  • The Smiling Lieutenant (1931-1932), 89 min

90-120 minutes

  • Alibi (1928-1929), 90 min
  • The Awful Truth (1937), 90 min
  • Bad Girl (1931-1932), 90 min
  • Disraeli (1929-1930), 90 min
  • Dr. Strangelove or: How I Learned to Stop Worrying and Love the Bomb (1964), 90 min
  • Four Daughters (1938), 90 min
  • Our Town (1940), 90 min
  • Ruggles of Red Gap (1935), 90 min
  • Cries and Whispers (1973), 91 min
  • The Full Monty (1997), 91 min
  • Gravity (2013), 91 min
  • The Informer (1935), 91 min
  • Babe (1995), 92 min
  • Father of the Bride (1950), 92 min
  • Stage Door (1937), 92 min
  • Tender Mercies (1983), 92 min
  • Annie Hall (1977), 93 min *
  • Beasts of the Southern Wild (2012), 93 min
  • Dead End (1937), 93 min
  • Good Night, and Good Luck (2005), 93 min
  • I Am a Fugitive from a Chain Gang (1932-1933), 93 min
  • The Thin Man (1934), 93 min
  • Here Comes Mr. Jordan (1941), 94 min
  • Lilies of the Field (1963), 94 min
  • Marty (1955), 94 min *
  • Midnight in Paris (2011), 94 min
  • 127 Hours (2010), 94 min
  • Sunrise: A Song of Two Humans (1927-1928), 94 min *
  • An Education (2009), 95 min
  • In Old Arizona (1928-1929), 95 min
  • The Letter (1940), 95 min
  • Boys Town (1938), 96 min
  • Five Easy Pieces (1970), 96 min
  • In Old Chicago (1937), 96 min
  • Juno (2007), 96 min
  • Lady for a Day (1932-1933), 96 min
  • Miracle on 34th Street (1947), 96 min
  • Pygmalion (1938), 96 min
  • Stagecoach (1939), 96 min
  • 12 Angry Men (1957), 96 min
  • Up (2009), 96 min
  • The Defiant Ones (1958), 97 min
  • Flirtation Walk (1934), 97 min
  • The Private Life of Henry VIII (1932-1933), 97 min
  • The Queen (2006), 97 min
  • State Fair (1932-1933), 97 min
  • Fargo (1996), 98 min
  • Libeled Lady (1936), 98 min
  • Philomena (2013), 98 min
  • Smilin’ Through (1932-1933), 98 min
  • Alice Adams (1935), 99 min
  • Blossoms in the Dust (1941), 99 min
  • Driving Miss Daisy (1989), 99 min *
  • Love Story (1970), 99 min
  • Suspicion (1941), 99 min
  • The Artist (2011), 100 min *
  • Breaking Away (1979), 100 min
  • Cleopatra (1934), 100 min
  • Separate Tables (1958), 100 min
  • Winter’s Bone (2010), 100 min
  • Broadway Melody of 1936 (1935), 101 min
  • Dodsworth (1936), 101 min
  • The Front Page (1930-1931), 101 min
  • Heaven Can Wait (1978), 101 min
  • The Lost Weekend (1945), 101 min *
  • The Maltese Falcon (1941), 101 min
  • Rachel, Rachel (1968), 101 min
  • A Soldier’s Story (1984), 101 min
  • Top Hat (1935), 101 min
  • The Adventures of Robin Hood (1938), 102 min
  • Casablanca (1943), 102 min *
  • East Lynne (1930-1931), 102 min
  • Johnny Belinda (1948), 102 min
  • Lost in Translation (2003), 102 min
  • Love is a Many-Splendored Thing (1955), 102 min
  • Moonstruck (1987), 102 min
  • Seven Brides for Seven Brothers (1954), 102 min
  • Three Coins in the Fountain (1954), 102 min
  • Born Yesterday (1950), 103 min
  • Jezebel (1938), 103 min
  • King Solomon’s Mines (1950), 103 min
  • A Letter to Three Wives (1949), 103 min
  • Little Miss Sunshine (2006), 103 min
  • My Left Foot (1989), 103 min
  • Sons and Lovers (1960), 103 min
  • Toy Story 3 (2010), 103 min
  • The Wizard of Oz (1939), 103 min
  • Wuthering Heights (1939), 103 min
  • Atlantic City (1981), 104 min
  • The Country Girl (1954), 104 min
  • The Crowd (1927-1928), 104 min
  • Dark Victory (1939), 104 min
  • The French Connection (1971), 104 min *
  • The More the Merrier (1943), 104 min
  • The Big Chill (1983), 105 min
  • Doctor Dolittle (1967), 105 min
  • It Happened One Night (1934), 105 min *
  • Kramer vs. Kramer (1979), 105 min *
  • The Long Voyage Home (1940), 105 min
  • Naughty Marietta (1935), 105 min
  • Shine (1996), 105 min
  • Sounder (1972), 105 min
  • Alexander’s Ragtime Band (1938), 106 min
  • Finding Neverland (2004), 106 min
  • Hannah and Her Sisters (1986), 106 min
  • Ivanhoe (1952), 106 min
  • A Serious Man (2009), 106 min
  • A Touch of Class (1973), 106 min
  • Cat on a Hot Tin Roof (1958), 107 min
  • Double Indemnity (1944), 107 min
  • Field of Dreams (1989), 107 min
  • The Gay Divorcee (1934), 107 min
  • The Kids are All Right (2010), 107 min
  • The Love Parade (1929-1930), 107 min
  • The Sixth Sense (1999), 107 min
  • American Graffiti (1973), 108 min
  • Arrowsmith (1931-1932), 108 min
  • Black Swan (2010), 108 min
  • Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner (1967), 108 min
  • Il Postino (1995), 108 min
  • Kitty Foyle (1940), 108 min
  • Les Misérables (1935), 108 min
  • On the Waterfront (1954), 108 min *
  • One Foot in Heaven (1941), 108 min
  • The Snake Pit (1948), 108 min
  • All the King’s Men (1949), 109 min *
  • The Bishop’s Wife (1947), 109 min
  • Deliverance (1972), 109 min
  • In the Heat of the Night (1967), 109 min *
  • The Lives of a Bengal Lancer (1935), 109 min
  • On Golden Pond (1981), 109 min
  • Up in the Air (2009), 109 min
  • The Barretts of Wimpole Street (1934), 110 min
  • The Broadway Melody (1928-1929), 110 min *
  • Cavalcade (1932-1933), 110 min *
  • The Citadel (1938), 110 min
  • The Goodbye Girl (1977), 110 min
  • Ninotchka (1939), 110 min
  • Norma Rae (1979), 110 min
  • Precious: Based on the Novel ‘Push’ by Sapphire (2009), 110 min
  • Seventh Heaven (1927-1928), 110 min
  • Sunset Boulevard (1950), 110 min
  • Bonnie and Clyde (1967), 111 min
  • Imitation of Life (1934), 111 min
  • Lenny (1974), 111 min
  • Mildred Pierce (1945), 111 min
  • Of Mice and Men (1939), 111 min
  • Spellbound (1945), 111 min
  • A Star is Born (1937), 111 min
  • True Grit (2010), 111 min
  • Butch Cassidy and the Sundance Kid (1969), 112 min
  • Crash (2005), 112 min *
  • The Crying Game (1992), 112 min
  • District 9 (2009), 112 min
  • Grand Hotel (1931-1932), 112 min *
  • Heaven Can Wait (1943), 112 min
  • The Philadelphia Story (1940), 112 min
  • Places in the Heart (1984), 112 min
  • Witness (1985), 112 min
  • An American in Paris (1951), 113 min *
  • Chicago (2002), 113 min *
  • The Conversation (1974), 113 min
  • Great Expectations (1947), 113 min
  • Hope and Glory (1987), 113 min
  • Midnight Cowboy (1969), 113 min *
  • The Patriot (1928-1929) (LOST), 113 min
  • Taxi Driver (1976), 113 min
  • Alfie (1966), 114 min
  • Capote (2005), 114 min
  • Gaslight (1944), 114 min
  • Goodbye, Mr. Chips (1939), 114 min
  • Grand Illusion (1938), 114 min
  • The Hours (2002), 114 min
  • Watch on the Rhine (1943), 114 min
  • Captains Courageous (1937), 115 min
  • The Descendants (2011), 115 min
  • The Fighter (2010), 115 min
  • The Heiress (1949), 115 min
  • In Which We Serve (1943), 115 min
  • The Little Foxes (1941), 115 min
  • Mr. Deeds Goes to Town (1936), 115 min
  • Nebraska (2013), 115 min
  • Picnic (1955), 115 min
  • Raiders of the Lost Ark (1981), 115 min
  • Room at the Top (1959), 115 min
  • San Francisco (1936), 115 min
  • Viva Villa! (1934), 115 min
  • Working Girl (1988), 115 min
  • Hold Back the Dawn (1941), 116 min
  • The Hollywood Revue of 1929 (1928-1929), 116 min
  • Life is Beautiful (1998), 116 min
  • The Life of Emile Zola (1937), 116 min *
  • MASH (1970), 116 min
  • The Piano (1993), 116 min
  • Tootsie (1982), 116 min
  • Witness for the Prosecution (1957), 116 min
  • Dallas Buyers Club (2013), 117 min
  • Four Weddings and a Funeral (1994), 117 min
  • Little Women (1932-1933), 117 min
  • A Room with a View (1986), 117 min
  • The Rose Tattoo (1955), 117 min
  • Battleground (1949), 118 min
  • The Dresser (1983), 118 min
  • Elizabeth (1998), 118 min
  • From Here to Eternity (1953), 118 min *
  • Gentleman’s Agreement (1947), 118 min *
  • How Green Was My Valley (1941), 118 min *
  • The Human Comedy (1943), 118 min
  • Julia (1977), 118 min
  • The King’s Speech (2010), 118 min *
  • The Last Picture Show (1971), 118 min
  • Roman Holiday (1953), 118 min
  • Shane (1953), 118 min
  • The Silence of the Lambs (1991), 118 min *
  • The Talk of the Town (1942), 118 min
  • Test Pilot (1938), 118 min
  • A Thousand Clowns (1965), 118 min
  • Captain Blood (1935), 119 min
  • Children of a Lesser God (1986), 119 min
  • Citizen Kane (1941), 119 min
  • Dangerous Liaisons (1988), 119 min
  • Decision Before Dawn (1951), 119 min
  • Fatal Attraction (1987), 119 min
  • Gigi (1958), 119 min *
  • Michael Clayton (2007), 119 min
  • Moulin Rouge (1952), 119 min
  • Rocky (1976), 119 min *
  • The Turning Point (1977), 119 min

120-150 min

  • Argo (2012), 120 min *
  • Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon (2000), 120 min
  • E.T. the Extra-Terrestrial (1982), 120 min
  • Foreign Correspondent (1940), 120 min
  • Kiss of the Spider Woman (1985), 120 min
  • A Man for All Seasons (1966), 120 min *
  • Platoon (1986), 120 min *
  • Slumdog Millionaire (2008), 120 min *
  • The Accidental Tourist (1988), 121 min
  • Awakenings (1990), 121 min
  • Chocolat (2000), 121 min
  • Julius Caesar (1953), 121 min
  • Midnight Express (1978), 121 min
  • Network (1976), 121 min
  • The Social Network (2010), 121 min
  • All That Jazz (1979), 122 min
  • American Beauty (1999), 122 min *
  • The Exorcist (1973), 122 min
  • Frost/Nixon (2008), 122 min
  • Missing (1982), 122 min
  • No Country for Old Men (2007), 122 min *
  • A Place in the Sun (1951), 122 min
  • Silver Linings Playbook (2012), 122 min
  • Star Wars (1977), 122 min
  • A Streetcar Named Desire (1951), 122 min
  • Trader Horn (1930-1931), 122 min
  • Atonement (2007), 123 min
  • Cimarron (1930-1931), 123 min *
  • 49th Parallel (1942), 123 min
  • Mister Roberts (1955), 123 min
  • Shakespeare in Love (1998), 123 min *
  • A Tale of Two Cities (1936), 123 min
  • Cabaret (1972), 124 min
  • The Caine Mutiny (1954), 124 min
  • Chariots of Fire (1981), 124 min *
  • The Elephant Man (1980), 124 min
  • The Grapes of Wrath (1940), 124 min
  • Jaws (1975), 124 min
  • Madame Curie (1943), 124 min
  • Ordinary People (1980), 124 min *
  • The Reader (2008), 124 min
  • The Apartment (1960), 125 min *
  • Coal Miner’s Daughter (1980), 125 min
  • Dog Day Afternoon (1975), 125 min
  • Random Harvest (1942), 125 min
  • Romeo and Juliet (1936), 125 min
  • The Bells of St. Mary’s (1945), 126 min
  • The Cider House Rules (1999), 126 min
  • Coming Home (1978), 126 min
  • Ghost (1990), 126 min
  • Good Will Hunting (1997), 126 min
  • Her (2013), 126 min
  • The Mission (1986), 126 min
  • The Russians are Coming, the Russians are Coming (1966), 126 min
  • The Treasure of the Sierra Madre (1948), 126 min
  • Yankee Doodle Dandy (1942), 126 min
  • You Can’t Take It With You (1938), 126 min *
  • Amour (2012), 127 min
  • Kings Row (1942), 127 min
  • Life of Pi (2012), 127 min
  • Moulin Rouge! (2001), 127 min
  • Sideways (2004), 127 min
  • Z (1969), 127 min
  • Darling (1965), 128 min
  • Dead Poets Society (1989), 128 min
  • Hugo (2011), 128 min
  • Milk (2008), 128 min
  • Mississippi Burning (1988), 128 min
  • The Pride of the Yankees (1942), 128 min
  • To Kill a Mockingbird (1962), 128 min
  • Tom Jones (1963), 128 min *
  • The Yearling (1946), 128 min
  • The Blind Side (2009), 129 min
  • Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close (2011), 129 min
  • The Grapes of Wrath (1940), 129 min
  • Mr. Smith Goes to Washington (1939), 129 min
  • The Quiet Man (1952), 129 min
  • Raging Bull (1980), 129 min
  • The Sting (1973), 129 min *
  • The Verdict (1982), 129 min
  • David Copperfield (1935), 130 min
  • Erin Brockovich (2000), 130 min
  • The Fugitive (1993), 130 min
  • Going My Way (1944), 130 min *
  • In the Bedroom (2001), 130 min
  • It’s a Wonderful Life (1946), 130 min
  • Prizzi’s Honor (1985), 130 min
  • Rebecca (1940), 130 min *
  • An Unmarried Woman (1978), 130 min
  • Chinatown (1974), 131 min
  • The Hurt Locker (2009), 131 min *
  • Unforgiven (1992), 131 min *
  • Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966), 131 min
  • Lost Horizon (1937), 132 min
  • Million Dollar Baby (2004), 132 min *
  • Mutiny on the Bounty (1935), 132 min *
  • The Prince of Tides (1991), 132 min
  • Terms of Endearment (1983), 132 min *
  • Twelve O’Clock High (1949), 132 min
  • Broadcast News (1987), 133 min
  • In the Name of the Father (1993), 133 min
  • The King and I (1956), 133 min
  • A Midsummer Night’s Dream (1935), 133 min
  • Moneyball (2011), 133 min
  • One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest (1975), 133 min *
  • Quiz Show (1994), 133 min
  • Rain Man (1988), 133 min *
  • The Red Shoes (1948), 133 min
  • The Sundowners (1960), 133 min
  • Brokeback Mountain (2005), 134 min
  • Captain Phillips (2013), 134 min
  • Fanny (1961), 134 min
  • The Hustler (1961), 134 min
  • The Lion in Winter (1968), 134 min
  • Mrs. Miniver (1942), 134 min *
  • The Remains of the Day (1993), 134 min
  • Sergeant York (1941), 134 min
  • 12 Years a Slave (2013), 134 min *
  • A Beautiful Mind (2001), 135 min *
  • The Robe (1953), 135 min
  • Bugsy (1991), 136 min
  • Sense and Sensibility (1995), 136 min
  • Airport (1970), 137 min
  • A Clockwork Orange (1971), 137 min
  • Friendly Persuasion (1956), 137 min
  • Gosford Park (2001), 137 min
  • Henry V (1946), 137 min
  • Mystic River (2003), 137 min
  • All About Eve (1950), 138 min *
  • All the President’s Men (1976), 138 min
  • All Quiet on the Western Front (1929-1930), 138 min *
  • American Hustle (2013), 138 min
  • A Few Good Men (1992), 138 min
  • The Good Earth (1937), 138 min
  • L.A. Confidential (1997), 138 min
  • Master and Commander: The Far Side of the World (2003), 138 min
  • Romeo and Juliet (1968), 138 min
  • As Good as It Gets (1997), 139 min
  • Jerry Maguire (1996), 139 min
  • Mary Poppins (1964), 139 min
  • The Tree of Life (2011), 139 min
  • Apollo 13 (1995), 140 min
  • Howards End (1992), 140 min
  • All This, and Heaven Too (1940), 141 min
  • Anthony Adverse (1936), 141 min
  • Forrest Gump (1994), 141 min *
  • The Killing Fields (1984), 141 min
  • Letters from Iwo Jima (2006), 141 min
  • Seabiscuit (2003), 141 min
  • Wings (1927-1928), 141 min *
  • Secrets & Lies (1996), 142 min
  • The Shawshank Redemption (1994), 142 min
  • Zorba the Greek (1964), 142 min
  • Anchors Aweigh (1945), 143 min
  • Auntie Mame (1958), 143 min
  • Babel (2006), 143 min
  • Anne of the Thousand Days (1969), 145 min
  • Born on the Fourth of July (1989), 145 min
  • Hello, Dolly! (1969), 145 min
  • The Razor’s Edge (1946), 145 min
  • Elmer Gantry (1960), 146 min
  • Goodfellas (1990), 146 min
  • The Help (2011), 146 min
  • War Horse (2011), 146 min
  • Bound for Glory (1976), 147 min
  • Sayonara (1957), 147 min
  • Traffic (2000), 147 min
  • Becket (1964), 148 min
  • Inception (2010), 148 min
  • The Nun’s Story (1959), 149 min
  • Ship of Fools (1965), 149 min

150-180 min

  • Lincoln (2012), 150 min
  • The Pianist (2002), 150 min
  • The Departed (2006), 151 min *
  • The Music Man (1962), 151 min
  • Doctor Dolittle (1967), 152 min
  • The Greatest Show on Earth (1952), 152 min *
  • Ray (2004), 152 min
  • West Side Story (1961), 152 min *
  • Apocalypse Now (1979), 153 min (Redux is 203)
  • Inglourious Basterds (2009), 153 min
  • Oliver! (1968), 153 min *
  • The Color Purple (1985), 154 min
  • Pulp Fiction (1994), 154 min
  • Wilson (1944), 154 min
  • The English Patient (1996), 155 min *
  • Funny Girl (1968), 155 min
  • Gladiator (2000), 155 min *
  • Hamlet (1948), 155 min *
  • The Song of Bernadette (1943), 156 min
  • The Insider (1999), 157 min
  • Les Misérables (2012), 157 min
  • Scent of a Woman (1992), 157 min
  • Zero Dark Thirty (2012), 157 min
  • The Guns of Navarone (1961), 158 min
  • There Will Be Blood (2007), 158 min
  • Anatomy of a Murder (1959), 160 min
  • The Last Emperor (1987), 160 min *
  • Nashville (1975), 160 min
  • Amadeus (1984), 161 min *
  • The Bridge on the River Kwai (1957), 161 min
  • Out of Africa (1985), 161 min *
  • Avatar (2009), 162 min
  • How the West Was Won (1963), 162 min
  • Peyton Place (1957), 162 min
  • Munich (2005), 163 min
  • A Passage to India (1984), 163 min
  • Django Unchained (2012), 165 min
  • The Towering Inferno (1974), 165 min
  • The Curious Case of Benjamin Button (2008), 166 min
  • Gangs of New York (2002), 166 min
  • The Alamo (1960), 167 min
  • The Aviator (2004), 169 min
  • Saving Private Ryan (1998), 169 min
  • For Whom the Bell Tolls (1943), 170 min
  • The Godfather Part III (1990), 170 min
  • My Fair Lady (1964), 170 min *
  • Patton (1970), 170 min *
  • Quo Vadis (1951), 171 min
  • The Thin Red Line (1998), 171 min
  • The Best Years of Our Lives (1946), 172 min *
  • Since You Went Away (1944), 172 min
  • America, America (1963), 174 min
  • The Sound of Music (1965), 174 min *
  • The Godfather (1972), 175 min *
  • Braveheart (1995), 177 min *
  • The Longest Day (1962), 178 min
  • The Lord of the Rings: The Fellowship of the Ring (2001), 178 min
  • Mutiny on the Bounty (1962), 178 min
  • Judgment at Nuremberg (1961), 179 min
  • The Lord of the Rings: The Two Towers (2002), 179 min
  • The Wolf of Wall Street (2013), 180 min

Over 180 minutes:

  • Dances with Wolves (1990), 181 min *
  • Fiddler on the Roof (1971), 181 min
  • The Sand Pebbles (1966), 182 min
  • Around the World in 80 Days (1956), 183 min *
  • The Deer Hunter (1978), 183 min *
  • Barry Lyndon (1975), 184 min
  • The Great Ziegfeld (1936), 185 min *
  • The Green Mile (1999), 188 min
  • JFK (1991), 189 min
  • Nicholas and Alexandra (1971), 189 min
  • Tess (1980), 190 min
  • The Emigrants (1972), 191 min
  • Gandhi (1982), 191 min *
  • The Right Stuff (1983), 193 min
  • Reds (1981), 194 min
  • Titanic (1997), 194 min *
  • Schindler’s List (1993), 195 min *
  • Doctor Zhivago (1965), 197 min
  • The Godfather Part II (1974), 200 min *
  • Giant (1956), 201 min
  • The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King (2003), 201 min *
  • Ben-Hur (1959), 212 min *
  • Lawrence of Arabia (1962), 216 min *
  • The Ten Commandments (1956), 219 min
  • Gone With the Wind (1939), 238 min *
  • Cleopatra (1963), 248 min


Best Picture Taglines:

  • Wings — “An Epic of the Air”
  • The Broadway Melody — “The Pulsating Drama of Broadway’s Bared Heart Speaks and Sings with a Voice to Stir Your Soul!”
  • All Quiet on the Western Front — “At Last… the Motion Picture!”
  • Cimarron — “World’s Mightiest Show!”
  • Grand Hotel — “Thank the Stars for a Great Entertainment!”
  • Cavalcade — “A Love that Suffered and Rose Triumphant Above the Crushing Events of This Modern Age! The March of Time Measured by a Mother’s Heart!”
  • It Happened One Night –“Two Great Lovers of the Screen in the Grandest of Romantic Comedies!”
  • Mutiny on the Bounty — “A Thousand Hours of Hell For One Moment of Love!”
  • The Great Ziegfeld — “10 Big Shows In 1”
  • The Life of Emile Zola — “He’ll Hold You In Silence As Deep As Your Emotions!”
  • You Can’t Take It With You — “You’ll love them all for giving you the swellest time you’ve ever had!”
  • Gone With the Wind — “The Greatest Romance of All Time!”
  • Rebecca — “The Shadow of this Woman Darkened Their Love.”
  • How Green Was My Valley — “Rich is Their Humor! Deep are Their Passions! Reckless are Their Lives! Mighty is Their Story!”
  • Mrs. Miniver — “In Her Arms . . . He Felt A Quiet Peace No Terror Could Disturb”
  • Casablanca — “They Had a Date with Fate in Casablanca!”
  • Going My Way — “Sing, Bing… You’re a Grand, Gay Guy in Your Greatest Picture!”
  • The Lost Weekend — “How Daring Can the Screen Dare to Be? No Adult Man or Woman Can Risk Missing the Startling Frankness of The Lost Weekend!”
  • The Best Years of Our Lives — “Filled with All the Love and Warmth and Joy… the Human Heart Can Hold!”
  • Gentleman’s Agreement — (Can’t find one)
  • Hamlet — (Can’t find one)
  • All the King’s Men — “He Might Have Been a Pretty Good Guy… If Too Much Power… and Women… Hadn’t Gone to His Head!”
  • All About Eve — “It’s All About Women — and Their men!”
  • An American in Paris — “What a Joy! It’s M-G-M’s Technicolor Musical!”
  • The Greatest Show on Earth — “The Heartbeat Story of Circus People, Filmed with the Cooperation of Ringling Bros. – Barnum and Bailey Circus!”
  • From Here to Eternity — “Pouring Out of Impassioned Pages… Brawling Their Way to Greatness on the Screen!”
  • On the Waterfront — “The Man Lived by the Jungle Law of the Docks!”
  • Marty — “It’s the Love Story of an Unsung Hero!”
  • Around the World in 80 Days — “See Everything in the World Worth Seeing! Do Everything in the World Worth Doing!”
  • The Bridge on the River Kwai — “It Spans a Whole New World of Entertainment!”
  • Gigi — “The First Lerner-Loewe Musical Since ‘My Fair Lady'”
  • Ben-Hur — “A Tale of the Christ”
  • The Apartment — “Movie-Wise, There Has Never Been Anything Like It – Laugh-Wise, Love-Wise, or Otherwise-Wise!”
  • West Side Story — “The Screen Achieves One of the Great Entertainments in the History of Motion Pictures”
  • Lawrence of Arabia — “A Mighty Motion Picture of Action and Adventure!”
  • Tom Jones — “The Whole World Loves Tom Jones!”
  • My Fair Lady — The Loverliest Motion Picture of Them All!
  • The Sound of Music — “The More You See It, The More It Becomes One of Your Favorite Things!”
  • A Man for All Seasons — “A Motion Picture for All Times!”
  • In the Heat of the Night — “They Got a Murder on Their Hands… They Don’t Know What to Do with It”
  • Oliver! — “Much More Than a Musical!”
  • Midnight Cowboy — “Whatever You Hear About Midnight Cowboy Is True”
  • Patton — (Can’t find one)
  • The French Connection — “The Time is Just Right for an Out and Out Thriller Like This.”
  • The Godfather — “An Offer You Can’t Refuse”
  • The Sting — “All It Takes is a Little Confidence”
  • The Godfather Part II — “Until You See ‘The Godfather, Part II’, You Don’t Know the Godfather Story!”
  • One Flew Over the Cuckoo’s Nest — “If He’s Crazy, What Does That Make You?”
  • Rocky — “His Whole Life Was a Million-to-One Shot”
  • Annie Hall — “A Nervous Romance”
  • The Deer Hunter — “One of the Most Important and Powerful Films of All Time!”
  • Kramer vs. Kramer — “There Are Three Sides to This Love Story!”
  • Ordinary People — “Some Films You Watch, Others You Feel”
  • Chariots of Fire — “This is the Story of Two Men Who Run… Not to Run… But to Prove Something to the World. They will Sacrifice Anything to Achieve their Goals…Except Their Honor.”
  • Gandhi — “His Triumph Changed the World Forever”
  • Terms of Endearment — “Come to Laugh, Come to Cry, Come to Care, Come to Terms”
  • Amadeus — “The Man. The Music. The Magic. The Madness. The Murder. The Mystery. The Motion Picture”
  • Out of Africa — “Based on a True Story”
  • Platoon — “The First Casualty of War is Innocence”
  • The Last Emperor — “He was the Lord of Ten Thousand Years, the Absolute Monarch of China. He was Born to Rule a World of Ancient Tradition. Nothing Prepared Him for Our World of Change”
  • Rain Man — (Can’t find one)
  • Driving Miss Daisy — “The Funny, Touching and Totally Irresistible Story of a Working Relationship That Became a 25-Year Friendship”
  • Dances with Wolves — “Inside Everyone is a Frontier Waiting to Be Discovered”
  • The Silence of the Lambs — “To Enter the Mind of a Killer She Must Challenge the Mind of a Madman”
  • Unforgiven — (Can’t find one)
  • Schindler’s List — “Whoever Saves One Life, Saves the World Entire”
  • Forrest Gump — “The Story of a Lifetime”
  • Braveheart — “He who Fought, Fought for Freedom”
  • The English Patient — “In Love There are No Boundaries”
  • Titanic — “Nothing on Earth Could Come Between Them”
  • Shakespeare in Love — “A Comedy About the Greatest Love Story Almost Never Told”
  • American Beauty — “Look Closer”
  • Gladiator — “A General who Became a Slave. A Slave who Became a Gladiator. A Gladiator who Defied an Emperor”
  • A Beautiful Mind — “The Only Thing Greater Than the Power of the Mind is the Courage of the Heart”
  • Chicago — “With the Right Song and Dance, You Can Get Away with Murder”
  • The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King — “This Christmas the Journey Ends”
  • Million Dollar Baby — Beyond His Silence, There is a Past. Beyond Her Dreams, There is a Feeling. Beyond Hope, There is a Memory. Beyond Their Journey, There is a Love”
  • Crash — “You Think You Know who You Are. You Have No Idea.”
  • The Departed — “Lies. Betrayal. Sacrifice. How Far Will You Take It?”
  • No Country for Old Men — “There Are No Clean Getaways”
  • Slumdog Millionaire — “Love and Money… You Have Mixed Them Both”
  •  The Hurt Locker — “You’ll Know When You’re In It”
  • The King’s Speech — “Find Your Voice”
  • The Artist — (Can’t find one)
  • Argo — “The Movie Was Fake. The Mission Was Real”
  • 12 Years a Slave — “The Extraordinary True Story of Solomon Northup”


List of Best Picture Presenters:

  • 1927-1928: Douglas Fairbanks (Wings)
  • 1928-1929: William C. deMille (The Broadway Melody)
  • 1929-1930: Louis B. Mayer (All Quiet on the Western Front)
  • 1930-1931: B.P. Schulberg (Cimarron)
  • 1931-1932: William LeBaron (Grand Hotel)
  • 1932-1933: Will Rogers (Cavalcade)
  • 1934: Irvin S. Cobb (It Happened One Night)
  • 1935: Harry Cohn (Mutiny on the Bounty)
  • 1936: George Jessel (The Great Ziegfeld)
  • 1937: Frank Capra (The Life of Emile Zola)
  • 1938: James Roosevelt (You Can’t Take It With You)
  • 1939: Y. Frank Freeman (Gone With the Wind)
  • 1940: Mervyn LeRoy (Rebecca)
  • 1941: David O. Selznick (How Green Was My Valley)
  • 1942: William Goetz (Mrs. Miniver)
  • 1943: Sidney Franklin (Casablanca)
  • 1944: Hal B. Wallis (Going My Way)
  • 1945: Eric Johnston (The Lost Weekend)
  • 1946: Eric Johnston (The Best Years of Our Lives)
  • 1947: Frederic March (Gentleman’s Agreement)
  • 1948: Ethel Barrymore (Hamlet)
  • 1949: James Cagney (All the King’s Men)
  • 1950: James Cagney (All About Eve)
  • 1951: Danny Kaye (An American in Paris)
  • 1952: Mary Pickford (The Greatest Show on Earth)
  • 1953: Cecil B. DeMille (From Here to Eternity)
  • 1954: Buddy Adler (On the Waterfront)
  • 1955: Audrey Hepburn (Marty)
  • 1956: Janet Gaynor (Around the World in 80 Days)
  • 1957: Gary Cooper (The Bridge on the River Kwai)
  • 1958: Ingrid Bergman (Gigi)
  • 1959: Gary Cooper (Ben-Hur)
  • 1960: Audrey Hepburn (The Apartment)
  • 1961: Fred Astaire (West Side Story)
  • 1962: Olivia de Havilland (Lawrence of Arabia)
  • 1963: Frank Sinatra (Tom Jones)
  • 1964: Gregory Peck (My Fair Lady)
  • 1965: Jack Lemmon (The Sound of Music)
  • 1966: Audrey Hepburn (A Man for All Seasons)
  • 1967: Julie Andrews (In the Heat of the Night)
  • 1968: Sidney Poitier (Oliver!)
  • 1969: Elizabeth Taylor (Midnight Cowboy)
  • 1970: Steve McQueen (Patton)
  • 1971: Jack Nicholson (The French Connection)
  • 1972: Clint Eastwood (The Godfather)
  • 1973: Elizabeth Taylor (The Sting)
  • 1974: Warren Beatty (The Godfather Part II)
  • 1975: Audrey Hepburn (One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest)
  • 1976: Jack Nicholson (Rocky)
  • 1977: Jack Nicholson (Annie Hall)
  • 1978: John Wayne (The Deer Hunter)
  • 1979: Charlton Heston (Kramer vs. Kramer)
  • 1980: Lillian Gish (Ordinary People)
  • 1981: Loretta Young (Chariots of Fire)
  • 1982: Carol Burnett (Gandhi)
  • 1983: Frank Capra (Terms of Endearment)
  • 1984: Laurence Olivier (Amadeus)
  • 1985: John Huston, Akira Kurosawa & Billy Wilder (Out of Africa)
  • 1986: Dustin Hoffman (Platoon)
  • 1987: Eddie Murphy (The Last Emperor)
  • 1988: Cher (Rain Man)
  • 1989: Warren Beatty & Jack Nicholson (Driving Miss Daisy)
  • 1990: Barbra Streisand (Dances with Wolves)
  • 1991: Paul Newman & Elizabeth Taylor (The Silence of the Lambs)
  • 1992: Jack Nicholson (Unforgiven)
  • 1993: Harrison Ford (Schindler’s List)
  • 1994: Robert De Niro & Al Pacino (Forrest Gump)
  • 1995: Sidney Poitier (Braveheart)
  • 1996: Al Pacino (The English Patient)
  • 1997: Sean Connery (Titanic)
  • 1998: Harrison Ford (Shakespeare in Love)
  • 1999: Clint Eastwood (American Beauty)
  • 2000: Michael Douglas (Gladiator)
  • 2001: Tom Hanks (A Beautiful Mind)
  • 2002: Kirk Douglas & Michael Douglas (Chicago)
  • 2003: Steven Spielberg (The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King)
  • 2004: Dustin Hoffman & Barbra Streisand (Million Dollar Baby)
  • 2005: Jack Nicholson (Crash)
  • 2006: Diane Keaton & Jack Nicholson (The Departed)
  • 2007: Denzel Washington (No Country for Old Men)
  • 2008: Steven Spielberg (Slumdog Millionaire)
  • 2009: Tom Hanks (The Hurt Locker)
  • 2010: Steven Spielberg (The King’s Speech)
  • 2011: Tom Cruise (The Artist)
  • 2012: Jack Nicholson and Michelle Obama (Argo)
  • 2013: Will Smith (12 Years a Slave)


Random Factoids:

  • Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? is the only film in the history of the Academy to be nominated in every category it was eligible to be nominated in.
  • Only three films have ever been nominated for Best Picture and nothing else: Grand Hotel (1932-1933), One Foot in Heaven (1941), and The Ox-Bow Incident (1943).
  • Teresa Wright is the only actress to be nominated for Oscars for her first three films, which were The Little Foxes, Mrs. Miniver and The Pride of the Yankees. She won for Mrs. Miniver. (Also, two of her next three films after these three were Shadow of a Doubt and The Best Years of Our Lives.)
  • From Here to Eternity is the last Best Picture winner to be nominated in all four acting categories. American Hustle is the most recent Best Picture nominee to be nominated in all four acting categories.
  • Marlon Brando holds the record for most consecutive Best Actor nominations (4, 1951, A Streetcar Named Desire, 1952, Viva Zapata!, 1953, Julius Caesar, 1954, On the Waterfront).
  • Bette Davis (5, 1938, Jezebel (won), 1939, Dark Victory, 1940, The Letter, 1941, The Little Foxes and 1942, Now, Voyager) and Greer Garson (5, 1941, Blossoms in the Dust, 1942, Mrs. Miniver (won), 1943, Madame Curie, 1944, Mrs. Parkington and 1945, The Valley of Decision) both hold the record for most consecutive Best Actress nominations
  • Thelma Ritter holds the record for most consecutive Best Supporting Actress nominations (4, 1950, All About Eve, 1951, The Mating Season, 1952, With a Song in My Heart, 1953, Pickup on South Street.)
  • Bing Crosby is the only person to reprise his Oscar-winning role and be nominated again for it.
  • Cate Blanchett (Elizabeth II), Peter O’Toole (Henry II), Paul Newman (“Fast” Eddie Felson) and Al Pacino (Michael Corleone) are the only other people to reprise an Oscar-nominated role (they didn’t win for) and be nominated again for it. Newman actually won the second time.
  • Paul Muni is the only actor whose first (The Valiant) and last (The Last Angry Man) screen performances were nominated for Oscars.
  • The Battle of Algiers is the only film to be nominated in two non-consecutive years (Best Foreign Language Film in 1966 and Best Adapted Screenplay in 1968.)
  • Since the Supporting categories were added (1936), only three times did the top six categories (Picture, Director, Actor, Actress, Supporting Actor, Supporting Actress) go to six completely different films:
      • 1952 —The Greatest Show on Earth, The Quiet Man, High Noon, Come Back Little Sheba, Viva Zapata!, The Bad and the Beautiful
      • 1956 — Around the World in 80 Days, Giant, The King and I, Anastasia, Lust for Life, Written on the Wind
      • 2005 — Crash, Brokeback Mountain, Capote, Walk the Line, Syriana, The Constant Gardener
  • Laurence Olivier, Michael Douglas and George Clooney are the only three actors to win both Best Picture and an acting award. Olivier won for Hamlet. Douglas won Best Picture for producing One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest and Best Actor for Wall Street. Clooney won Best Supporting Actor for Syriana and Best Picture for producing Argo.
  • Now’s also a good time to mention — Walt Disney and George Clooney are the only people to be nominated across six different Oscar categories. Walt’s categories are: Best Picture, Best Short Subject – Cartoons, Best Documentary, Best Short Subject — Two-reel, Best Documentary – Short Subject, and Best Short Subject — Live Action Subjects. Clooney’s (which are more impressive) are: Best Picture (Argo, win), Best Director (Good Night and Good Luck, nominated), Best Actor (Michael Clayton, nominated, Up in the Air, nominated, and The Descendants, nominated), Best Supporting Actor (Syriana, win), Best Original Screenplay (Good Night and Good Luck) and Best Adapted Screenplay (The Ides of March).
    • Warren Beatty has five categories to his name (the same as Clooney, only he never got a Supporting Actor nomination). Unlike Clooney, he only has one win.
    • Other people with nominations over five categories are: Joel & Ethan Coen (Best Picture, Best Director, Best Original Screenplay, Best Adapted Screenplay, Best Editing (4 wins)), Stanley Kubrick (Best Picture, Best Director, Best Original Screenplay, Best Adapted Screenplay and Best Visual Effects (1 win)), and Kenneth Branagh (Best Picture, Best Director, Best Actor, Best Supporting Actor, Best Live Action Short (0 wins)).
  • Charlie Chaplin (The Great Dictator), Laurence Olivier (Henry V, Hamlet, Richard III, Othello), Woody Allen (Annie Hall), Warren Beatty (Heaven Can Wait, Reds), Kenneth Branagh (Henry V), Clint Eastwood (Unforgiven, Million Dollar Baby), Billy Bob Thornton (Sling Blade), Robert Duvall (The Apostle), Roberto Benigni (Life is Beautiful) and Ed Harris (Pollock) are the only actors who directed themselves to Oscar nominations (with Olivier and Benigni winning).
  • In 1965, Julie Christie won Best Actress for Darling. She was also in Doctor Zhivago that same year. Both of those films won the Original and Adapted Screenplay categories for that year.
  • Frances McDormand is the only person to be directed to an acting win by their spouse (Joel Coen).
    • Melina Mercouri (Never on Sunday), Joanne Woodward (Rachel, Rachel), Gena Rowlands (A Woman Under the Influence), Julie Andrews (Victor/Victoria) and Bérénice Bejo (The Artist) were also directed to nominations by their spouses. (Not counting Susan Sarandon for Dead Man Walking. I’m only including official marriages, since — there are lots of instances of people sleeping together and making a picture. The Sarandon one is the closest to counting, but — they broke up. So I mention it, but don’t officially inclue it.)
  • Vanessa Redgrave (Morgan!) & Lynn Redgrave (Georgy Girl), and Olivia de Havilland (Hold Back the Dawn) & Joan Fontaine (Suspicion) are the only siblings to be nominated for Oscars in the same category in the same year. (Fontaine won.)
    • Warren Beatty (Best Director for Reds) and Shirley MacLaine (Best Actress for Terms of Endearment) are also sibling Oscar-winners (along with de Havilland and Fontaine).
  • Jodie Foster is the only actress to win two Best Actress Awards (1988, The Accused, 1991, The Silence of the Lambs) before the age of 30 in two non-consecutive years.
    • Bette Davis (1935, Dangerous, 1938, Jezebel) and Hilary Swank (1999, Boys Don’t Cry, 2004, Million Dollar Baby) both won their second award in their 31st year.
    • Luise Rainer won Best Actress in consecutive years (1936, The Great Ziegfeld, 1937, The Good Earth) at ages 26 and 27.
  • Each time Jack Nicholson has won an Oscar (1975, One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest (Best Actor), 1983, Terms of Endearment (Best Supporting Actor), 1997, As Good As It Gets (Best Actor)), his leading lady in that film (Louise Fletcher, Shirley MacLaine, Helen Hunt, respectively) won Best Actress for that film.
  • Glenda Jackson (1970, Women in Love) is the first actress whose Best Actress-winning performance contained a nude scene.
  • Only five actors have been nominated for performances for roles in which they do not speak a word (which means Marlee Matlin doesn’t count): Jane Wyman (in Johnny Belinda), Patty Duke (in The Miracle Worker), Holly Hunter (in The Piano), Samantha Morton (in Sweet and Lowdown) and Rinko Kikuchi (in Babel). Some might argue Patty Duke does speak a word, but compared to Marlee Matlin, I’m rounding toward this list. Also, you’ll notice that we have three deaf (one deaf and blind) and two mute. And an alarmingly high percentage of wins.
  • (Amateur hour. You better know this.) Walt Disney has the most Oscars. He won 22.
  • (More amateur hour stuff). The DGA and Best Director Oscar have differed only seven times (not counting an unofficial eighth, where Joseph Mankiewicz won the DGA for A Letter to Three Wives in 1948, but won the Oscar for Best Director for the film in 1949. It was the first year the DGA Awards were given out, so most people overlook that one, since technically it did match up): 1968 — the DGA winner was Anthony Harvey for The Lion in Winter and the Oscar winner was Carol Reed for Oliver!, 1972 — the DGA winner was Francis Ford Coppola for The Godfather and the Oscar winner was Bob Fosse for Cabaret. 1985 — the DGA winner was Steven Spielberg for The Color Purple and the Oscar winner was Sydney Pollack for Out of Africa (Spielberg wasn’t even nominated). 1995 — the DGA winner was Ron Howard for Apollo 13 and the Oscar winner was Mel Gibson for Braveheart (Howard wasn’t even nominated). 2000 — the DGA winner was Ang Lee for Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon and the Oscar winner was Steven Soderbergh for Traffic. 2002 — the DGA winner was Rob Marshall for Chicago and the Oscar winner was Roman Polanski for The Pianist. And 2012 — the DGA winner was Ben Affleck for Argo and the Oscar winner was Ang Lee for Life of Pi (Affleck wasn’t even nominated). Ang Lee is the only person to be involved in more than one of these instances.
  • This is one of my favorite facts: The Red Balloon is the only non-feature to win a Best Screenplay award. It’s also the only film without dialogue to win Best Screenplay. (Showing you the strength of a good story. Hollywood…)
  • Only Anthony Quinn (1952, Best Supporting Actor, Viva Zapata! & 1956, Best Supporting Actor, Lust for Life), Jason Robards (1976, Best Supporting Actor, All the President’s Men & 1977, Best Supporting Actor, Julia) and Daniel Day-Lewis (1989, Best Actor, My Left Foot & 2012, Lincoln) have won multiple Oscars for playing real people. No one else with multiple Oscars has won for playing more than one real person.
  • And while we’re here, the only actors to win more than one Supporting Oscar are: Walter Brennan (1936, Come and Get It, 1938, Kentucky and 1940, The Westerner), Anthony Quinn (1952, Viva Zapata! and 1956, Lust for Life),  Shelley Winters (1959, The Diary of Anne Frank and 1965, A Patch of Blue), Peter Ustinov (1960, Spartacus and 1964, Topkapi), Melvyn Douglas (1963, Hud and 1979, Being There), Jason Robards (1976, All the President’s Men and 1977, Julia), Michael Caine (1986, Hannah and Her Sisters and 1999, The Cider House Rules), Dianne Wiest (1986, Hannah and Her Sisters and 1994, Bullets over Broadway) and Christoph Waltz (2009, Inglourious Basterds and 2012 Django Unchained).
  • Only three foreign language films (that is, films that feature a language other than English spoken for a large percentage of its run time) have won Best Picture: The Godfather Part II, The Last Emperor and Slumdog Millionaire.
  • At the 1928-1929 Oscars, no film won more than one award. That has never happened before or since (and will likely never happen again).
  • William Wyler directed 35 actors to Oscar nominations (with 13 wins).
  • Taylor Hackford is the only director to have directed two black actors to Oscar-winning performances (Louis Gossett Jr., Jamie Foxx)
  • Three 6 Mafia = 1 Oscar. Alfred Hitchcock = 0. (Had to amend it. It’s too good not to use.)
  • The only films to win Best Picture and Best Song are Going My Way, Gigi, TitanicThe Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King and Slumdog Millionaire.
  • Frederic March (Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde) and Lee Marvin (Cat Ballou) are the only actors who won an Oscar for a dual-role. (Technically Laurence Olivier counts too, since he was both Hamlet and the voice of the ghost in Hamlet. But fuck that.)
  • Spencer Tracy (1937, Captains Courageous, 1938, Boys Town) and Tom Hanks (1993, Philadelphia, 1994, Forrest Gump) are the only two actors to win back-to-back Best Actor Oscars. Coincidentally, both did it at the exact same ages, 37 for the first Oscar and 38 for the second.
  • Only two films won Best Actor, Best Director and Best Screenplay but not Best Picture.
    • The Informer (1935. Lost to Mutiny on the Bounty)
    • The Pianist (2002. Lost to Chicago)
  • Emma Thompson is the only person to have an acting Oscar (1992, Howards End) and a writing Oscar (1995, Sense and Sensibility).
  • Cate Blanchett (The Aviator, Katharine Hepburn, won) and Robert Downey Jr. (Chaplin, Charlie Chaplin) are the only actors in history to be nominated for an Oscar for playing an Oscar-winning actor.
  • No Best Actress winner in the 1950s appeared in a Best Picture winner.
  • On-the-nose, but it must be said. There have only been six ties in Academy history. They were in 1931-1932 for Best Actor (Wallace Beery for The Champ and Frederic March for Dr. Jekyll and Mr. Hyde. March received one more vote than Beery, but under then Academy rules, anything less than three votes became a tie), 1949 for Best Documentary Short (A Chance to Live and So Much for So Little), 1968 for Best Actress (Katharine Hepburn for The Lion in Winter and Barbra Streisand for Funny Lady), 1986 for Best Documentary (Artie Shaw: Time Is All You’ve Got and Down and Out in America), 1994 for Best Live-Action Short (Franz Kafka’s It’s a Wonderful Life and Trevor) and 2012 for Best Sound Editing (Skyfall and Zero Dark Thirty).
  • Mutiny on the Bounty is the first remake to win Best Picture. Ben-Hur is the second. My Fair Lady the third. The Departed, fourth. (Technically, Marty is a big-screen remake of a teleplay. Also, Titanic and Chicago (and to some extent, The Departed) are partly based on earlier films, though the latter is based on the musical that was based on the film (which was based on a play), and the former really only has the sinking of the ship in common. It’s not really a remake at all.)
    • Moulin Rouge! and Heaven Can Wait are also both remakes of earlier Best Picture nominees (Moulin Rouge from 1952 and Here Comes Mr. Jordan from 1941).
  • The Godfather Part II is the first sequel to win Best Picture. The Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King is the second.
  • The Bells of St. Mary’s is the first sequel to be nominated for Best Picture.
  • Only The Lord of the Rings and The Godfather have had every film in their trilogies nominated for Best Picture.
  • Skippy is the first and only (thus far) film to be based on a comic book/strip or graphic novel to be nominated for Best Picture.
  • A Midsummer Night’s Dream is the first Shakespeare adaptation to be nominated for Best Picture.
  • The Fugitive is the first film to be based on a television series and be nominated for Best Picture. (The most recent is Traffic.)
  • Toy Story 3 is the only sequel to be nominated for Best Picture without its predecessors being nominated.
  • Despicable Me 2 is the only sequel to be nominated for Best Animated Feature nominee where the initial entry in the franchise was not previously nominated in the category.
  • She Done Him Wrong is the shortest film to be nominated for Best Picture (run time: 66 minutes).
  • Gone With the Wind is the longest film to be nominated for Best Picture (run time: 238 minutes. Though without overture/intermission/entr’acte and exit music, it’s 224 minutes).
  • The character of Henry VIII was nominated for an Oscar three times (1932-1933, Best Actor, Charles Laughton, The Private Life of Henry VIII (won), 1966, Best Supporting Actor, Robert Shaw, A Man for All Seasons, 1969, Best Actor, Richard Burton, Anne of the Thousand Days)
    • Characters nominated twice include: Leslie Crosbie (1929, Jeanne Eagels, The Letter, 1940, Bette Davis, The Letter), Esther Blodgett/Vicki Lester (1937, Janet Gaynor, A Star is Born, 1954, Judy Garland, A Star is Born), Norman Maine (1937, Frederic March, A Star is Born, 1954, James Mason, A Star is Born), Henry Higgins (1938, Leslie Howard, Pygmalion, 1964, Rex Harrison My Fair Lady (won)), Mr. Chips (1939, Robert Donat, Goodbye, Mr. Chips (won), 1969, Peter O’Toole, Goodbye, Mr. Chips), Abraham Lincoln (1940, Raymond Massey, Abraham Lincoln in Illinois, 2012, Daniel Day-Lewis, Lincoln (won)) Joe Pendleton (1941, Robert Montgomery, Here Comes Mr. Jordan, 1978, Warren Beatty, Heaven Can Wait), Father O’Malley (1944 & 1945, Bing Crosby, Going My Way (won) & The Bells of St. Mary’s), Henry V (1946, Laurence Olivier, Henry V, 1989, Kenneth Branagh, Henry V), Cyrano de Bergerac (1950, José Ferrer, Cyrano de Bergerac (won), 1990, Gerard Depardieu, Cyrano de Bergerac), “Fast” Eddie Felson (1961, Paul Newman, The Hustler & The Color of Money) Rooster Cogburn (1969, John Wayne, True Grit (won), 2010, Jeff Bridges, True Grit), Vito Corleone (1972, Marlon Brando, The Godfather, 1974, Robert De Niro, The Godfather Part II  (both won)), Michael Corleone (1972 & 1974, Al Pacino, The Godfather & The Godfather Part II), Richard Nixon (1995, Anthony Hopkins, Nixon, 2008, Frank Langella, Frost/Nixon)
    • Also, curiously, both times two people were nominated for playing the same character (younger and older versions) in the same film, Kate Winslet played the younger character both times. First was in Titanic. She was younger Rose, while Gloria Stuart was Old Rose. And the second was in Iris, where she was young Iris and Judi Dench was old Iris.
    • And also, in 1998, both Cate Blanchett and Judi Dench were both nominated (with Judi winning) for playing Queen Elizabeth I, in separate films.
  • The only films to win Best Director but not be nominated for Best Picture are Two Arabian Knights (won Best Director, 1927-1928 for Lewis Milestone in the Comedy category) and The Divine Lady (won Best Director in 1928-1929 for Frank Lloyd).
  • Only four films have won Best Picture without a Best Director nomination: 1927-1928, Wings, 1931-1932, Grand Hotel, 1989, Driving Miss Daisy, and 2012, Argo.
  • In 1987, all five of the Best Director nominees (Bernardo Bertolucci, John Boorman, Lasse Hallstrom, Norman Jewison, Adrian Lyne) were foreign born. (Italy, UK, Sweden, Canada, UK, in case you’re interested.)
  • (Child’s Play. This is a fact everybody knows) Barry Fitzgerald is the only actor to be nominated for Best Actor and Best Supporting Actor for the same performance (Going My Way).
  • Only Barry Fitzgerald (1944), Al Pacino (1992), Jamie Foxx (2004) have been nominated for both Best Actor and Best Supporting Actor in the same year. All three came away with an Oscar (Pacino and Foxx won lead, while Fitzgerald won Supporting).
  • On the female side, Fay Bainter (1938), Teresa Wright (1942), Jessica Lange (1982), Sigourney Weaver (1988), Holly Hunter (1993), Emma Thompson (1993), Julianne Moore (2002) and Cate Blanchett (2007) were all nominated for Best Actress and Best Supporting Actress in the same year. Hunter is the only one to win lead. Bainter, Wright, and Lange won Supporting. Weaver, Thompson, Moore and Blanchett came away with nothing.
  • The Silence of the Lambs (1991) was the first film to win Best Picture to be released on home video before winning Best Picture.
  • Only John Ford (1940, The Grapes of Wrath, 1941, How Green Was My Valley) and Joseph L. Mankiewicz (1949, A Letter to Three Wives, 1950, All About Eve) won consecutive Best Director Oscars. (Mankiewicz actually won both Best Director and Best Screenplay in consecutive years.)
  • Only three black directors have ever been nominated for Best Director: 1991, John Singleton, Boyz N the Hood, 2009, Lee Daniels, Precious: Based on the Novel “Push” by Sapphire, and 2013, Steve McQueen, 12 Years a Slave.
  • Only four women have ever been nominated for Best Director (one twice): 1976, Lina Wermuller, Seven Beauties, 1993, Jane Campion, The Piano, 2003, Sofia Coppola, Lost in Translation, 2009, Kathryn Bigelow, The Hurt Locker, 2009. You better fucking know which one of them won.)
    • Other female directors who directed Best Picture nominees (but obviously were not nominated for Best Director) are: Randa Haines (Children of a Lesser God), Penny Marshall (Awakenings), Barbra Streisand (The Prince of Tides), Valerie Ferris (Little Miss Sunshine, co-directed with her husband, Jonathan Dayton), Lone Scherfig (An Education), Lisa Cholodenko (The Kids Are All Right), Debra Granik (Winter’s Bone) and Kathryn Bigelow (Zero Dark Thirty).
  • The only films to have their entire speaking casts nominated for awards were: Sleuth (1972), Give ‘Em Hell, Harry (1975), Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf? (1966). The first had two cast members, the second had one, the third had four. (Also, Doubt (2008) had its entire credited cast nominated for Oscars, but not its entire speaking cast.)
  • Only four times were a duo nominated for Best Director: 1961, West Side Story (Robert Wise & Jerome Robbins), 1978, Heaven Can Wait (Warren Beatty & Buck Henry), 2007, No Country for Old Men (Joel & Ethan Coen) and 2010, True Grit (Joel & Ethan Coen). (Only Joel was officially nominated for Fargo.)
  • Only three times was a director (officially) nominated for Best Director twice in the same category: 1929-1930, Clarence Brown (Anna Christie & Romance), 1938, Michael Curtiz (Angels with Dirty Faces & Four Daughters) and 2000, Steven Soderbergh (Erin Brockovich & Traffic.)
  • A Streetcar Named Desire and Network are the only two films to win three acting awards.
  • Both Bette Davis (1938, Jezebel, 1939, Dark Victory, 1940, The Letter, 1941, The Little Foxes, 1942, Now, Voyager) and Greer Garson (1941, Blossoms in the Dust, 1942, Mrs. Miniver, 1943, Madame Curie, 1944, Mrs. Parkington, 1945, The Valley of Decision) are the only two actresses nominated for five consecutive Best Actress Oscars (the only actors to have five consecutive nominations, period).
    • Also, for trivia purposes, Garson was nominated in 1939 for Goodbye, Mr. Chips and missed in 1940, and Davis missed in 1943 and was nominated in 1944 for Mr. Skeffington. This means that, from 1938-1945, Bette Davis and/or Greer Garson were nominated for Best Actress (and both were nominated in the same category four times).
  • Other actors to be nominated for Oscars in four consecutive years (I already said Brando and Ritter up there) are:
    • Jennifer Jones (1943, Best Actress, The Song of Bernadette, 1944, Best Supporting Actress, Since You Went Away, 1945, Best Actress, Love Letters, 1946, Best Actress, Duel in the Sun)
    • Al Pacino (1972, Best Supporting Actor, The Godfather, 1973, Best Actor Serpico, 1974, Best Actor, The Godfather Part II, 1975, Best Actor, Dog Day Afternoon)
  • Jeff Bridges is the only person to be nominated for Best Actor for playing a non-human character (Starman).
  • Luise Rainer, Vivien, Hilary Swank, Helen Hayes and Kevin Spacey are the only actors to win two Oscars for their only two nominated roles.
  • The shortest performance ever nominated for an Oscar was Hermione Baddeley for Room at the Top. The entire performance was 2 minutes, 32 seconds of screen time.
  • Greg P. Russell holds the record for total nominations without a win (16). Randy Newman used to hold the record, until he won on his 15th nomination.
  • John Williams holds the record for living person with the most nominations, with 49.
  • Jason Robards is the only actor to win consecutive Supporting Oscars.
  • (Another basic Oscar trivia fact) Limelight (1952) won Best Original Score at the 1972 Oscars, twenty years after the film was released. The reason for this was because, in order for a film to be eligible for Academy Awards, it must have screened in Los Angeles, which Limelight did not do until 1972. The Godfather‘s score was also deemed ineligible, which allowed the film to become nominated and win. (This was also Charlie Chaplin’s only competitive Oscar win.)
  • William Wyler holds the record with 7 consecutive Best Director nominations (1936, Dodsworth, 1937, Dead End, 1938, Jezebel, 1939, Wuthering Heights, 1940, The Letter, 1941, The Little Foxes, 1942, Mrs. Miniver).
  • Of the 22 films to win Best Director but not Best Picture, seven of those wins went either to George Stevens (1951, 1956), John Ford (1935, 1940, 1952) or Ang Lee (2005, 20112).
  • Flora Robson (1945, Saratoga Trunk), Jeanne Crain (1949, Pinky), and Susan Kohner (1959, Imitation of Life) are the only whites to be nominated for playing black characters. (Technically, Crain and Kohner played half-white/half-black characters, so they were able to get away with it, especially since their being fair-skinned is a major part of the story. Only the Robson performance is truly racist. Note: Holy shit.)
    • Note: Robert Downey Jr.’s character in Tropic Thunder was technically a white man. (See? I know how you think. I’m all over that shit.)
  • No Asian females have ever been nominated for Best Actress. (Luise Rainer won one for playing an Asian, but no actual Asians have ever been nominated.)
  • The only performances to win an Oscar based primarily in a foreign language were: Sophia Loren (Best Actress, 1961, Two Women, Italian), Robert De Niro (Best Supporting Actor, 1974, The Godfather Part II, Italian), Benicio del Toro (Best Supporting Actor, 2000, Traffic, Spanish), Marion Cotillard (Best Actress, 2008, La Vie en Rose, French), and Christoph Waltz (Best Supporting Actor, 2009, Inglourious Basterds, German, French). Always the romance languages.
  • Schindler’s List (1993) is the first black-and-white film to win Best Picture since The Apartment (1960). The Artist (2011) is the second.
  • The Artist (2011) becomes the only other silent film besides Wings (1927-1928) to win Best Picture.
  • W.S. Van Dyke holds the record for most films to receive Oscar nominations in a single year. In 1934, four of the films he directed received 7 Oscar nominations:
    • The Thin Man was nominated for Best Picture, Best Actor, Best Director, and Best Screenplay)
    • Manhattan Melodrama was nominated for (and won) Best Original Story
    • Hide-Out was also nominated for Best Original Story
    • Eskimo was nominated for (and won) Best Editing
  • Steven Spielberg holds the record for films that won the most Oscars in a single year, with 15 wins. In 1993, Schindler’s List won 12 Oscars, and Jurassic Park won 3.
  • Only three times have married couples both won acting Oscars:
    • Vivien Leigh (Gone With the Wind, A Streetcar Named Desire) and Laurence Olivier (Hamlet)
    • Paul Newman (The Color of Money) and Joanne Woodward (The Three Faces of Eve)
    • Catherine Zeta-Jones (Chicago) and Michael Douglas (Wall Street)
  • Other “couples” of sorts to win Oscars:
    • Spencer Tracy (Captains Courageous, Boys Town) and Katharine Hepburn (Morning Glory, Guess Who’s Coming to Dinner, The Lion in Winter, On Golden Pond)
    • Tim Robbins (Mystic River) and Susan Sarandon (Dead Man Walking). Her former husband Chris Sarandon was also nominated for Dog Day Afternoon.
    • Diane Keaton (Annie Hall) and Woody Allen (Annie Hall, Best Director). She was also linked with Warren Beatty during Reds, which he won Best Director for. This isn’t really as solid as the ones who were actually married.
  • Six married couples (technically married, since one of these was definitely a beard situation) were nominated for acting Oscars in the same year:
    • Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne — The Guardsman, 1931-1932.
    • Charles Laughton and Elsa Lanchester — Witness for the Prosecution, 1957.
    • Richard Burton and Elizabeth Taylor — Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, 1966.
    • Frank Sinatra and Ava Gardener — him for From Here to Eternity, her for Mogambo, 1953.
    • Rex Harrison and Rachel Roberts — him for Cleopatra and her for This Sporting Life, 1963.
    • Note: Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie are not technically married, so him being nominated for The Curious Case of Benjamin Button and her being nominated for Changeling in 2008 doesn’t count. (See? I know where you were going with that.)
    • Also, William Powell and Carole Lombard are the only divorced couple to both be nominated for the same film — My Man Godfrey, 1936.
  • And while we’re here, there are also some famous families whose members have won Oscars (or were nominated):
    • The Hustons: Walter won Best Supporting Actor for The Treasure of the Sierra Madre, John also won for Sierra Madre, Best Director and Best Screenplay, and Anjelica won Best Supporting Actress for Prizzi’s Honor (also directed by John). (John and Walter were also nominated a bunch of other times.)
    • The Barrymores: Lionel won Best Actor for A Free Soul and was nominated for Best Director for Best Director for Madame X. Ethel won Best Supporting Actress for None But the Lonely Heart (and was nominated a couple other times).
    • The Minnellis: Vincente won Best Director for Gigi (was nominated other times as well), Liza won Best Actress for Cabaret (and was nominated again as well), and Judy Garland won an honorary Oscar for The Wizard of Oz.
    • The Coppolas: Francis won Best Director for The Godfather Part II and Best Screenplay for Patton, The Godfather and The Godfather Part II, Carmine won Best Original Score for The Godfather Part II, Sofia won Best Screenplay for Lost in Translation, and Nic Coppola (aka Cage) won Best Actor for Leaving Las Vegas.
    • The Douglases: Kirk Douglas was nominated for Best Actor 3 times (1949, Champion, 1952, The Bad and the Beautiful, and 1956, Lust for Life), and his son, Michael Douglas, won Best Actor for Wall Street, 1987 (and Best Picture for One Flew over the Cuckoo’s Nest, 1975).
    • And then for fun: Jon Voight (Coming Home, 1978, plus 3 other nominations) and his daughter, Angelina Jolie (Girl, Interrupted, 1999, plus one other nomination), both have Oscars. And Goldie Hawn (Cactus Flower, 1969) and her daughter, Kate Hudson (Almost Famous, 2000) were both nominated for Oscars (Goldie won). So were the Phoenix brothers (River, Running on Empty, 1987, and Joaquin, Gladiator, 2000. Joaquin was also nominated for Walk the Line in 2005). And Meg (Agnes of God, 1985) and Jennifer (Bullets over Broadway, 1994) Tilly. Raymond Massey (Abe Lincoln in Illinois, 1940) and his son, Daniel Massey (Star!, 1968) were also both nominated. And there’s also Ryan (Love Story, 1970) and Tatum (Paper Moon, 1973) O’Neal.
    • Also, Diane Ladd and Laura Dern are the only mother/daughter combination to be nominated for being in the same film (Rambling Rose).
  • And, of course, the big Oscar fact, that always bears repeating: John Cazale only appeared in five films in his entire career — The Godfather, The Conversation, The Godfather Part II, Dog Day Afternoon and The Deer Hunter — and all five were nominated for Best Picture (3 wins).

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