Posts tagged “Best Movie Posters

Mike’s Top Ten Movie Posters of 2019

What do we always say? The movie poster is a lost art.

Especially now more than ever, with Netflix. Netflix doesn’t even make posters for most of their movies, and if they do, it’s just one, and often times it’s generic and designed to be that little picture to get you to click on the film. Which means that on top of the general laziness that’s out there in creating memorable marketing images for films, an ever-increasing percentage of films aren’t even getting proper posters.

I started this feature originally to shout out some really great posters I saw back in 2011, but now that I actively seek them out each year to find the great ones, there’s been a considerable and noticeable decrease in quality over the years, which is disturbing since it was already bad back then!

Movie posters used to be works of art. They used creative imagery to sell you on a movie, perfectly capturing the essence of the film in a single image. Think of all the great movie posters people would have on their walls. What the hell is there now? What’s gonna be on people’s walls in ten years from this decade? And of course, because I’m a masochist, I try to find 50 each year that I point out as being my favorite for the year. But at this rate, we might have to cut that number down going forward because I don’t know if there are gonna be 50 good posters. Everything’s folding into the same three type of posters — famous people’s faces, character posters, collages. That’s it. That’s every damn poster.

So, here we are, dear friends, trying to find the diamonds in the shit pile that is modern movie posters.

Here are my favorite movie posters of 2019: (more…)


Mike’s Favorite Movie Posters of 2019 (30-11)

What do we always say? The movie poster is a lost art.

Especially now more than ever, with Netflix. Netflix doesn’t even make posters for most of their movies, and if they do, it’s just one, and often times it’s generic and designed to be that little picture to get you to click on the film. Which means that on top of the general laziness that’s out there in creating memorable marketing images for films, an ever-increasing percentage of films aren’t even getting proper posters.

I started this feature originally to shout out some really great posters I saw back in 2011, but now that I actively seek them out each year to find the great ones, there’s been a considerable and noticeable decrease in quality over the years, which is disturbing since it was already bad back then!

Movie posters used to be works of art. They used creative imagery to sell you on a movie, perfectly capturing the essence of the film in a single image. Think of all the great movie posters people would have on their walls. What the hell is there now? What’s gonna be on people’s walls in ten years from this decade? And of course, because I’m a masochist, I try to find 50 each year that I point out as being my favorite for the year. But at this rate, we might have to cut that number down going forward because I don’t know if there are gonna be 50 good posters. Everything’s folding into the same three type of posters — famous people’s faces, character posters, collages. That’s it. That’s every damn poster.

So, here we are, dear friends, trying to find the diamonds in the shit pile that is modern movie posters.

Here are my favorite movie posters of 2019: (more…)


Mike’s Favorite Movie Posters of 2019 (50-31)

What do we always say? The movie poster is a lost art.

Especially now more than ever, with Netflix. Netflix doesn’t even make posters for most of their movies, and if they do, it’s just one, and often times it’s generic and designed to be that little picture to get you to click on the film. Which means that on top of the general laziness that’s out there in creating memorable marketing images for films, an ever-increasing percentage of films aren’t even getting proper posters.

I started this feature originally to shout out some really great posters I saw back in 2011, but now that I actively seek them out each year to find the great ones, there’s been a considerable and noticeable decrease in quality over the years, which is disturbing since it was already bad back then!

Movie posters used to be works of art. They used creative imagery to sell you on a movie, perfectly capturing the essence of the film in a single image. Think of all the great movie posters people would have on their walls. What the hell is there now? What’s gonna be on people’s walls in ten years from this decade? And of course, because I’m a masochist, I try to find 50 each year that I point out as being my favorite for the year. But at this rate, we might have to cut that number down going forward because I don’t know if there are gonna be 50 good posters. Everything’s folding into the same three type of posters — famous people’s faces, character posters, collages. That’s it. That’s every damn poster.

So, here we are, dear friends, trying to find the diamonds in the shit pile that is modern movie posters.

Here are my favorite movie posters of 2019: (more…)


Mike’s Top Ten Movie Posters of 2018

I start this article every year with the same statement: the movie poster is a lost art.

It gets truer each year, and actually becomes more disgusting as time goes on, because now, with the rise of the streaming service, they don’t even bother putting out posters for some movies anymore. And the big mainstream stuff, it’s devolved into character posters and giant collages of all the actors’ faces on them. They’re only interested in selling the IP and the people in the movie rather than selling the movie. They’re either trading off a known property or images from great posters from years back, or they’re putting famous faces into the same collage they use for everything else. If you love a good movie poster as I do, you should be disgusted with the stuff they’re putting out.

A good movie poster should give you everything you need to know about a film in a single image. It should be both eye-catching and thematically relevant. Bonus points if you look at it and immediately want to see the movie more than you did before you saw it.

Offhand, can you immediately name more than five posters you saw this year and went, “Oh wow”? And here I’m trying to come up with 50. So that’s my struggle each year. But in listing as many as I do, you start to learn certain things. One, you’ll realize just how little the big studio films need to bother doing anything creative in their marketing. Two, you’ll learn that certain filmmakers are always the same ones putting care and consideration into their marketing, which always makes them stand out. And three, you’ll see, with me including so many different posters, just how few there really are that are truly fantastic. And four — this one’s more of a pipe dream — hopefully you’ll learn just how easy it is to put any kind of creativity in a poster, and if you end up being someone that is a part of this process at any point, maybe you’ll help change this disturbing trend we’re on.

But anyway, here are my favorite movie posters of 2018. (more…)


Mike’s Favorite Movie Posters of 2018 (30-11)

I start this article every year with the same statement: the movie poster is a lost art.

It gets truer each year, and actually becomes more disgusting as time goes on, because now, with the rise of the streaming service, they don’t even bother putting out posters for some movies anymore. And the big mainstream stuff, it’s devolved into character posters and giant collages of all the actors’ faces on them. They’re only interested in selling the IP and the people in the movie rather than selling the movie. They’re either trading off a known property or images from great posters from years back, or they’re putting famous faces into the same collage they use for everything else. If you love a good movie poster as I do, you should be disgusted with the stuff they’re putting out.

A good movie poster should give you everything you need to know about a film in a single image. It should be both eye-catching and thematically relevant. Bonus points if you look at it and immediately want to see the movie more than you did before you saw it.

Offhand, can you immediately name more than five posters you saw this year and went, “Oh wow”? And here I’m trying to come up with 50. So that’s my struggle each year. But in listing as many as I do, you start to learn certain things. One, you’ll realize just how little the big studio films need to bother doing anything creative in their marketing. Two, you’ll learn that certain filmmakers are always the same ones putting care and consideration into their marketing, which always makes them stand out. And three, you’ll see, with me including so many different posters, just how few there really are that are truly fantastic. And four — this one’s more of a pipe dream — hopefully you’ll learn just how easy it is to put any kind of creativity in a poster, and if you end up being someone that is a part of this process at any point, maybe you’ll help change this disturbing trend we’re on.

But anyway, here are my favorite movie posters of 2018. (more…)


Mike’s Favorite Movie Posters of 2018 (50-31)

I start this article every year with the same statement: the movie poster is a lost art.

It gets truer each year, and actually becomes more disgusting as time goes on, because now, with the rise of the streaming service, they don’t even bother putting out posters for some movies anymore. And the big mainstream stuff, it’s devolved into character posters and giant collages of all the actors’ faces on them. They’re only interested in selling the IP and the people in the movie rather than selling the movie. They’re either trading off a known property or images from great posters from years back, or they’re putting famous faces into the same collage they use for everything else. If you love a good movie poster as I do, you should be disgusted with the stuff they’re putting out.

A good movie poster should give you everything you need to know about a film in a single image. It should be both eye-catching and thematically relevant. Bonus points if you look at it and immediately want to see the movie more than you did before you saw it.

Offhand, can you immediately name more than five posters you saw this year and went, “Oh wow”? And here I’m trying to come up with 50. So that’s my struggle each year. But in listing as many as I do, you start to learn certain things. One, you’ll realize just how little the big studio films need to bother doing anything creative in their marketing. Two, you’ll learn that certain filmmakers are always the same ones putting care and consideration into their marketing, which always makes them stand out. And three, you’ll see, with me including so many different posters, just how few there really are that are truly fantastic. And four — this one’s more of a pipe dream — hopefully you’ll learn just how easy it is to put any kind of creativity in a poster, and if you end up being someone that is a part of this process at any point, maybe you’ll help change this disturbing trend we’re on.

But anyway, here are my favorite movie posters of 2018. (more…)


Mike’s Top Ten Movie Posters of 2017

I say it every year — the movie poster is a lost art. That statement is even more relevant this year. I’m not gonna sugarcoat it — this year sucked for movie posters.

In today’s marketplace, about half the product is based on built-in IP that can trade off iconic images in previously known versions of that product. The other half are smaller movies that maybe get one poster at most, and usually that poster is created off the same generic template as most posters and is designed to make you think of other movies that you went to see in the past. Or, the new wrinkle is that a bunch of movies are now being released on Netflix, who doesn’t need to bother marketing the films and doesn’t even bother giving you posters for them. As such, there’s really no great use of imagery out there anymore.

Last year, I felt, was actually a really strong year for posters. This year, it felt like every poster I saw was either trading off its own brand (Disney, Marvel, even Blade Runner) or reminiscent of some other movie poster from years past. Few posters actually gave a shit to give you a great image. Usually at least one of a movie’s posters is great — because, as I usually say, there are like five different posters for every major movie. Teaser, first official, second official, character posters, IMAX poster, etc — but this year it didn’t even feel like they tried on those.

A good movie poster is one that sells its stars and its subject matter, boiling down the themes of a film into a single image. Ideally, you look at that poster, know exactly what it’s about, and are left with the thought of, “Oh, I wanna see that.” Did anything really stand out to you this year? (more…)


Mike’s Favorite Movie Posters of 2017 (30-11)

I say it every year — the movie poster is a lost art. That statement is even more relevant this year. I’m not gonna sugarcoat it — this year sucked for movie posters.

In today’s marketplace, about half the product is based on built-in IP that can trade off iconic images in previously known versions of that product. The other half are smaller movies that maybe get one poster at most, and usually that poster is created off the same generic template as most posters and is designed to make you think of other movies that you went to see in the past. Or, the new wrinkle is that a bunch of movies are now being released on Netflix, who doesn’t need to bother marketing the films and doesn’t even bother giving you posters for them. As such, there’s really no great use of imagery out there anymore.

Last year, I felt, was actually a really strong year for posters. This year, it felt like every poster I saw was either trading off its own brand (Disney, Marvel, even Blade Runner) or reminiscent of some other movie poster from years past. Few posters actually gave a shit to give you a great image. Usually at least one of a movie’s posters is great — because, as I usually say, there are like five different posters for every major movie. Teaser, first official, second official, character posters, IMAX poster, etc — but this year it didn’t even feel like they tried on those.

A good movie poster is one that sells its stars and its subject matter, boiling down the themes of a film into a single image. Ideally, you look at that poster, know exactly what it’s about, and are left with the thought of, “Oh, I wanna see that.” Did anything really stand out to you this year? (more…)


Mike’s Favorite Movie Posters of 2017 (50-31)

I say it every year — the movie poster is a lost art. That statement is even more relevant this year. I’m not gonna sugarcoat it — this year sucked for movie posters.

In today’s marketplace, about half the product is based on built-in IP that can trade off iconic images in previously known versions of that product. The other half are smaller movies that maybe get one poster at most, and usually that poster is created off the same generic template as most posters and is designed to make you think of other movies that you went to see in the past. Or, the new wrinkle is that a bunch of movies are now being released on Netflix, who doesn’t need to bother marketing the films and doesn’t even bother giving you posters for them. As such, there’s really no great use of imagery out there anymore.

Last year, I felt, was actually a really strong year for posters. This year, it felt like every poster I saw was either trading off its own brand (Disney, Marvel, even Blade Runner) or reminiscent of some other movie poster from years past. Few posters actually gave a shit to give you a great image. Usually at least one of a movie’s posters is great — because, as I usually say, there are like five different posters for every major movie. Teaser, first official, second official, character posters, IMAX poster, etc — but this year it didn’t even feel like they tried on those.

A good movie poster is one that sells its stars and its subject matter, boiling down the themes of a film into a single image. Ideally, you look at that poster, know exactly what it’s about, and are left with the thought of, “Oh, I wanna see that.” Did anything really stand out to you this year? (more…)


Mike’s Top Ten Movie Posters of 2016

You know what I’m gonna say — the movie poster is a lost art.

Because the movie industry is divided into movies with built-in audiences that don’t need to market and tiny movies that aren’t gonna get a giant audience no matter how hard they market them, nobody much cares about the posters anymore. Either they’re the same cut-and-paste jobs with the same five templates or they’re putting the stars’ names on them with some sort of stock image from the film that is only there to get you in the theater.

But a good movie poster is about tying stars and subject matter. It sells your stars and encapsulates the themes of a film in a single image. And no one cares about that now. Plus, there are so many posters for a movie — the teaser, the first official poster, the second official poster, character posters — that they don’t take any chances and all fit them into a standard format that you’ve seen a hundred times over.

By the time this year is over, I’ll have seen over 350 new films from 2016 alone. And I barely found 50 of them that made me at least go, “Oh, that’s kinda nice.” Which, if you’re doing the math, is less than 15%. So if you’re in a movie theater and walk by five movie posters, the odds that two of them are gonna be great is not in your favor. It’s a shame.

But, since there are a few really good ones that come out, I like to celebrate the ones that actually do put a little effort into selling themselves. So I comb through 85% of shit in order to uncover the 15% of diamonds among them. Well… maybe like 8% diamonds and 7% cubic zirconia.

That said, here are my favorite posters of 2016: (more…)


Mike’s Top Ten Movie Posters of 2016 (30-11)

You know what I’m gonna say — the movie poster is a lost art.

Because the movie industry is divided into movies with built-in audiences that don’t need to market and tiny movies that aren’t gonna get a giant audience no matter how hard they market them, nobody much cares about the posters anymore. Either they’re the same cut-and-paste jobs with the same five templates or they’re putting the stars’ names on them with some sort of stock image from the film that is only there to get you in the theater.

But a good movie poster is about tying stars and subject matter. It sells your stars and encapsulates the themes of a film in a single image. And no one cares about that now. Plus, there are so many posters for a movie — the teaser, the first official poster, the second official poster, character posters — that they don’t take any chances and all fit them into a standard format that you’ve seen a hundred times over.

By the time this year is over, I’ll have seen over 350 new films from 2016 alone. And I barely found 50 of them that made me at least go, “Oh, that’s kinda nice.” Which, if you’re doing the math, is less than 15%. So if you’re in a movie theater and walk by five movie posters, the odds that two of them are gonna be great is not in your favor. It’s a shame.

But, since there are a few really good ones that come out, I like to celebrate the ones that actually do put a little effort into selling themselves. So I comb through 85% of shit in order to uncover the 15% of diamonds among them. Well… maybe like 8% diamonds and 7% cubic zirconia.

That said, here are my favorite posters of 2016: (more…)


Mike’s Favorite Movie Posters of 2016 (50-31)

You know what I’m gonna say — the movie poster is a lost art.

Because the movie industry is divided into movies with built-in audiences that don’t need to market and tiny movies that aren’t gonna get a giant audience no matter how hard they market them, nobody much cares about the posters anymore. Either they’re the same cut-and-paste jobs with the same five templates or they’re putting the stars’ names on them with some sort of stock image from the film that is only there to get you in the theater.

But a good movie poster is about tying stars and subject matter. It sells your stars and encapsulates the themes of a film in a single image. And no one cares about that now. Plus, there are so many posters for a movie — the teaser, the first official poster, the second official poster, character posters — that they don’t take any chances and all fit them into a standard format that you’ve seen a hundred times over.

By the time this year is over, I’ll have seen over 350 new films from 2016 alone. And I barely found 50 of them that made me at least go, “Oh, that’s kinda nice.” Which, if you’re doing the math, is less than 15%. So if you’re in a movie theater and walk by five movie posters, the odds that two of them are gonna be great is not in your favor. It’s a shame.

But, since there are a few really good ones that come out, I like to celebrate the ones that actually do put a little effort into selling themselves. So I comb through 85% of shit in order to uncover the 15% of diamonds among them. Well… maybe like 8% diamonds and 7% cubic zirconia.

That said, here are my favorite posters of 2015: (more…)


Mike’s Top Ten Movie Posters of 2015

The movie poster is a lost art.

Look at 90% of the posters you see in theaters. They’re all the same. You’ve seen the templates before. Nothing is original. There are a few hundred new theatrical releases every year, and maybe you get 25 posters that are really doing something new or interesting. How often do you see a poster and go, “What is that movie?”

Not to mention, because there are so many posters come out (teaser poster, first poster, second poster, character poster) we’re never left with a singular image from a film. No one really sells a film anymore. Typically the only time you see a great poster for a film is when there is a singular voice behind it. Directors with strong visions tend to be the ones with the good posters.

I like to celebrate this dying art by appreciating when a film actually puts forth an effort into designing a memorable poster. I search through all the posters of the year and pick out the ones that I feel do the best job of selling their product (regardless of the quality of that product). I want a poster that is simple, memorable, tells you exactly what a movie is about in a single image, or just looks really cool.

Here are my top ten posters of 2015: (more…)


Mike’s Top Ten Movie Posters of 2015 (30-11)

The movie poster is a lost art.

Look at 90% of the posters you see in theaters. They’re all the same. You’ve seen the templates before. Nothing is original. There are a few hundred new theatrical releases every year, and maybe you get 25 posters that are really doing something new or interesting. How often do you see a poster and go, “What is that movie?”

Not to mention, because there are so many posters come out (teaser poster, first poster, second poster, character poster) we’re never left with a singular image from a film. No one really sells a film anymore. Typically the only time you see a great poster for a film is when there is a singular voice behind it. Directors with strong visions tend to be the ones with the good posters.

I like to celebrate this dying art by appreciating when a film actually puts forth an effort into designing a memorable poster. I search through all the posters of the year and pick out the ones that I feel do the best job of selling their product (regardless of the quality of that product). I want a poster that is simple, memorable, tells you exactly what a movie is about in a single image, or just looks really cool.

Here are my favorite posters of 2015: (more…)


Mike’s Favorite Movie Posters of 2015 (50-31)

The movie poster is a lost art.

Look at 90% of the posters you see in theaters. They’re all the same. You’ve seen the templates before. Nothing is original. There are a few hundred new theatrical releases every year, and maybe you get 25 posters that are really doing something new or interesting. How often do you see a poster and go, “What is that movie?”

Not to mention, because there are so many posters come out (teaser poster, first poster, second poster, character poster) we’re never left with a singular image from a film. No one really sells a film anymore. Typically the only time you see a great poster for a film is when there is a singular voice behind it. Directors with strong visions tend to be the ones with the good posters.

I like to celebrate this dying art by appreciating when a film actually puts forth an effort into designing a memorable poster. I search through all the posters of the year and pick out the ones that I feel do the best job of selling their product (regardless of the quality of that product). I want a poster that is simple, memorable, tells you exactly what a movie is about in a single image, or just looks really cool.

Here are my favorite posters of 2015: (more…)


Mike’s Top Ten Movie Posters of 2014

The movie poster is a lost art.

That is always the first thing I say when I start talking about my favorite posters of the year. I started this feature back in 2011, when I saw the poster for The Ides of March and thought, “That’s one of the most original poster designs I’ve ever seen.” And it made me realize just how lazy advertising departments are now, regurgitating the same twelve poster designs, trying to remind you of all the other movies like that one that you saw, rather than doing something that sticks out and is unique, and makes you want to see the movie purely on its poster design. How often now do you see a poster and go, “Man, what is that movie?”

At this point so many different variations of a poster get released (teaser posters, first poster, second poster, character posters, DVD cover art), it’s hard to even keep track of them. So rarely are we left with a singular image from a film. It’s because the marketing team only cares about trying to make money for a film and not about truly selling the film. You’ll see more and more that what end up being the best posters of the year are films with a deliberate voice behind them, which either means that the director is very hands on and cares about their product, all the way down to the marketing, or because the voice of the filmmaker is so strong, it bleeds over into the marketing.

The point is — even though the art of movie poster making is a dying one, I’m still going to celebrating the good that is left. I look for posters that are simple, memorable, and tell you exactly what a movie is about in a single image. Or, sometimes things are just cool. It’ll be pretty obvious as we go.

So here are my top ten posters of 2014: (more…)


Mike’s Top Ten Movie Posters of 2014 (30-11)

The movie poster is a lost art.

That is always the first thing I say when I start talking about my favorite posters of the year. I started this feature back in 2011, when I saw the poster for The Ides of March and thought, “That’s one of the most original poster designs I’ve ever seen.” And it made me realize just how lazy advertising departments are now, regurgitating the same twelve poster designs, trying to remind you of all the other movies like that one that you saw, rather than doing something that sticks out and is unique, and makes you want to see the movie purely on its poster design. How often now do you see a poster and go, “Man, what is that movie?”

At this point so many different variations of a poster get released (teaser posters, first poster, second poster, character posters, DVD cover art), it’s hard to even keep track of them. So rarely are we left with a singular image from a film. It’s because the marketing team only cares about trying to make money for a film and not about truly selling the film. You’ll see more and more that what end up being the best posters of the year are films with a deliberate voice behind them, which either means that the director is very hands on and cares about their product, all the way down to the marketing, or because the voice of the filmmaker is so strong, it bleeds over into the marketing.

The point is — even though the art of movie poster making is a dying one, I’m still going to celebrating the good that is left. I look for posters that are simple, memorable, and tell you exactly what a movie is about in a single image. Or, sometimes things are just cool. It’ll be pretty obvious as we go.

So here are my favorite posters of 2014: (more…)


Mike’s Favorite Movie Posters of 2014 (50-31)

The movie poster is a lost art.

That is always the first thing I say when I start talking about my favorite posters of the year. I started this feature back in 2011, when I saw the poster for The Ides of March and thought, “That’s one of the most original poster designs I’ve ever seen.” And it made me realize just how lazy advertising departments are now, regurgitating the same twelve poster designs, trying to remind you of all the other movies like that one that you saw, rather than doing something that sticks out and is unique, and makes you want to see the movie purely on its poster design. How often now do you see a poster and go, “Man, what is that movie?”

At this point so many different variations of a poster get released (teaser posters, first poster, second poster, character posters, DVD cover art), it’s hard to even keep track of them. So rarely are we left with a singular image from a film. It’s because the marketing team only cares about trying to make money for a film and not about truly selling the film. You’ll see more and more that what end up being the best posters of the year are films with a deliberate voice behind them, which either means that the director is very hands on and cares about their product, all the way down to the marketing, or because the voice of the filmmaker is so strong, it bleeds over into the marketing.

The point is — even though the art of movie poster making is a dying one, I’m still going to celebrating the good that is left. I look for posters that are simple, memorable, and tell you exactly what a movie is about in a single image. Or, sometimes things are just cool. It’ll be pretty obvious as we go.

So here are my favorite posters of 2014: (more…)


Mike’s Top Ten Movie Posters of 2013

The other day, I started counting down my favorite movie posters of 2013.

To me, the movie poster is a lost art. Everything now looks like the same poster. They all use the same templates, and rather than creating something that’s unique and bold, all movie posters are meant to make you feel comfortable and look like the posters for other movies that made a lot of money, in the hopes that that movie will also make a lot of money. It’s synecdoche for the entire industry — it’s more about commerce than art, in most situations.

Of course, that’s not always true, an once in a while, a poster will take a chance. Or the vision of a film will be so unique that it’ll give way to some powerful imagery that will undoubtedly make its way onto a poster. That’s what this set of articles is for — appreciating the movie posters that stick out among the dreck. We make year-end lists for everything else, so why not posters too?

What I love about a good poster is — it’ll make you want to see a movie. Even if you had no intentions of seeing that movie before (which is saying something, coming from the guy who sees everything anyway), a good poster will make you go, “I might just give that a shot.” Or, what’s even better, when you know nothing about the movie and it gets you to look it up and possibly see it. The beauty of the movie poster is that it can be enjoyed wholly separately from the film it’s advertising.

Today, we finish our list with my ten favorite posters of 2013: (more…)


Mike’s Favorite Movie Posters of 2013 (30-11)

Yesterday, I started counting down my favorite movie posters of 2013.

To me, the movie poster is a lost art. Everything now looks like the same poster. They all use the same templates, and rather than creating something that’s unique and bold, all movie posters are meant to make you feel comfortable and look like the posters for other movies that made a lot of money, in the hopes that that movie will also make a lot of money. It’s synecdoche for the entire industry — it’s more about commerce than art, in most situations.

Of course, that’s not always true, an once in a while, a poster will take a chance. Or the vision of a film will be so unique that it’ll give way to some powerful imagery that will undoubtedly make its way onto a poster. That’s what this set of articles is for — appreciating the movie posters that stick out among the dreck. We make year-end lists for everything else, so why not posters too?

What I love about a good poster is — it’ll make you want to see a movie. Even if you had no intentions of seeing that movie before (which is saying something, coming from the guy who sees everything anyway), a good poster will make you go, “I might just give that a shot.” Or, what’s even better, when you know nothing about the movie and it gets you to look it up and possibly see it. The beauty of the movie poster is that it can be enjoyed wholly separately from the film it’s advertising.

Today, we’ll be doing the next 20 posters on my list, culminating with a top ten tomorrow. (more…)


Mike’s Favorite Movie Posters of 2013 (50-31)

The movie poster is a lost art. Don’t believe me?

(more…)


Mike’s Top Ten Movie Posters of 2012

I threw an article together of these last year, and I had so much fun picking them out that I decided to make it an annual thing.

The creation of movie posters is a lost art. All those classic images of movies — when you think of certain movies, the first thing you see in your mind is the poster. Gone With the Wind, Scarface, Ghostbusters, Forest Gump, Jaws, The Exorcist — these are classic images that we’ll always remember. Nowadays it’s all just cut and paste and photoshop — get as many faces on the poster as possible, repeat the same layouts over and over to remind you of other successful movies. Not to mention — so many movies have multiple posters, and then they change the DVD and Blu-Ray artwork, so there are  so many different images for a film that nobody even looks at the posters anymore. It’s a shame.

So this exercise has become not only about pointing out which movie posters I liked over a year, but celebrating the lost art of movie poster making. I love when posters (whether the film is good or not. As you’ll see, I loved some posters this year from movies that weren’t well-received at all) have really smart or iconic images on them. Think of my favorite poster from last year, Ides of March — that’s one of those posters that’s gonna be one of the most famous images of all time (or so I’ll keep saying until it is). A good movie poster should tell you what a film is about in a single, memorable image. And so few do that now.

So let’s celebrate the good movie posters of 2012: (more…)


The Best Movie Posters of 2011

I had a thought yesterday, and for me, now, having a thought is like being drunk with friends – whenever you think of anything out loud, no matter how stupid, crazy or hypothetical it was, the immediate response is, “DO IT!”

“I kind of want to pee off this balcony right now.” “DO IT!” “Wouldn’t it be awesome if I chugged the rest of that bottle?” “DO IT!”

This “DO IT!” had to do with my thought of how there were so few good film posters out nowadays. What ever happened to Baby Jane the art of poster creation?

Remember all those classic posters from years gone by? Gone With the Wind, Jaws, ScarfaceVertigo, Full Metal JacketGhostbusters – there are hundreds of them.

Nowadays, it’s all cut, copy, paste, photoshop. Every poster is designed to remind you of something else that made money, or of a famous poster from a while back. There are sites all over the internet (which I won’t link to, but all you need to do is search and you’ll find a bunch of them) that show you how derivative most of these posters are. It’s terrible.

So, in order to promote the good, here are my favorite movie posters from 2011: (more…)