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Archive for May 29, 2011

Update on the Oscar Quest: 1 Year

I didn’t want to post one of these this month, but it’s exactly one year since I started the Quest, so I kind of have to, right? Plus this post is also my 300th. It feels appropriate to have 300 be an Oscar Quest post. This also comes on the eve of the 150th day of the year, so now I’m officially averaging two posts per day. (I’m a boss.) There was really no reason not to do this. So I’m going to dedicate this update to pinpointing exactly when this whole ball of (alas) earwax got started.

It’s kind of murky as to when the Quest officially began. Here’s what I know, via Netflix telling me and from just remembering stuff. I know I didn’t start the Quest until after I had graduated and was back home. I know this, because my graduation present to myself when I was done with college was watching all the Bond movies. And I know I only made it through half of You Only Live Twice on campus, between senior week and all the drinking and such. I know that first week back was spent watching the rest of those. At the same time, Netflix says I had in my possession when I returned home, How the West Was Won, The Best Years of Our Lives and Cabaret. All three had shipped prior to me coming home, but none were returned before May 29th, which meant I didn’t watch them until then (Cabaret actually wasn’t even returned until June 3rd). So I don’t think any of them were part of a conscious effort to watch Oscar films. More of a general, “I should see these films” kind of deal. I think they were just films I wanted to see. But I’m sure they gave me the idea.

The film that actually seems to be the one that started the Quest was Chicago. It was shipped from Netflix on May 29th. Getting that film was the start of a conscious effort to see all the Best Picture winners. So that’s why I’ve marked May 29th as the day the Quest started. It’s the day I sent back those other two films and started getting exclusively Oscar films. May 29th also happens to be today. See what I did there?

(more…)

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The Oscar Quest: Best Supporting Actor – 1966

The thing I remember best about 1966 is that it’s one of, if not the only — double checking on this right now. Yes it is — it’s the only year in the history of the Academy (with five Best Picture nominees) where the Best Actor category matched up exactly with the Best Picture category. That is — all the Best Actor nominees were all the male leads of the five Best Picture nominees. No other category can boast that. There are a couple of fours, and 1964 has four matches and one repeat, but, the other nominee didn’t really have a male lead, so, 1966 will always be the only year (unless they go back to five nominees) where Best Actor matched Best Picture.

It also was a pretty good year overall, with A Man For All Seasons winning Best Picture, Paul Scofield winning Best Actor for it and Fred Zinnemann winning Best Director for it, and then every other award going to the other film that was just as great that year, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, with Elizabeth Taylor winning Best Actress and Sandy Dennis winning Best Supporting Actress. The only other category that wasn’t won by either of those two films (but not for lack of trying), was this category, which is a pleasant little change up. Because who doesn’t love Walter Matthau?

BEST SUPPORTING ACTOR – 1966

And the nominees were…

Mako, The Sand Pebbles

James Mason, Georgy Girl

Walter Matthau, The Fortune Cookie

George Segal, Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?

Robert Shaw, A Man for All Seasons (more…)


Pic of the Day: “Well, you can forget your troubles with those Imperial slugs. I told you I’d outrun ’em…Don’t everyone thank me at once.”